“Pursuit” is storm chaser Mike Olbinski’s latest work (and it’s shot with Canon gear)

Mike olbinski

I featured previous works by Mike Olbinski, a talented videographer with a passion for chasing storms all over the United States.

PURSUIT (available in 4K and 8K) is Mike’s latest work. And it’s stunning and jawdropping, the way we are used by his movies. Writes Mike:

This past spring was a tough one. Supercell structure and beautiful tornadoes had been very hard to come by. In fact, the tornado in the opening of this film was the only good one I saw this entire year. I had been on the road longer than ever before. Driven more miles. I was away from my family for 12 straight days at one point, and when I got home, I had to tell them I was going back out 24 hours later for June 12th. It was just too good to pass up. It promised to be a day that I could get everything I had been hoping for this spring and I had no choice. My wife understood, even though I knew she wished I stayed home. And I wished it too

Blu-Ray discs are available here. The music is by Peter Nanasi. You can follow Mike Olbinski on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

Mike used two Canon 5DSR’s along with Canon 11-24mm, 35mm, 50mm, 135mm and Sigma Art 50mm lenses, and Manfrotto tripods. The final product was edited in Lightroom with LR Timelapse, After Effects and Premiere Pro.

This jaw-dropping video shows the full cloud inversion, a rare phenomenon in the Grand Canyon, and was shot with Canon gear

 

The amazing video above shows a rare phenomenon known as the full cloud inversion. Harun Mehmedinovic tells us what the phenomenon is about, and how they produced the video:

Millions of visitors a year come to Arizona’s Grand Canyon National Park, one of the seven natural wonders of the world and the most visited national park in the western United States. However, on extremely rare days when cold air is trapped in the canyon and topped by a layer of warm air, which in combination with moisture and condensation, form the phenomenon referred to as the full cloud inversion. In what resembles something between ocean waves and fast clouds, Grand Canyon is completely obscured by fog, making the visitors feel as if they are walking on clouds.

This video was filmed as part of SKYGLOW, an ongoing crowdfunded quest to explore the effects and dangers of urban light pollution in contrast with some of the most incredible dark sky areas in North America. This project is being produced in collaboration with International Dark-Sky Association, a non-profit fighting for the preservation of night skies around the globe.

Canon EOS 5Ds R and EOS 5D Mark III cameras and Canon lenses were used to shot the film, sponsored by Canon USA, aided by Alpine Labs‘ Michron & Pulse, powered by Paul C. Buff Vagabond Mini. LRTimelapse was used to process some of the shots.

Original video premiered on BBC Earth. High resolution stills can be found here.

“Pulse” is a beautiful black & white time-lapse of storms, monsoons and supercells

“Pulse” Is A Beautiful Black & White Time-lapse Of Storms, Monsoons And Supercells

I featured works by Mike Olbinski previously (1 | 2 | 3), beautiful time-lapse movies of storms, tornados, thunderstorms, you name it. He’s a storm chaser and he makes outstanding time-lapses.

This time we feature Pulse (4k), a black and white time-lapse of monsoons and supercell. Says Mike Olbinski:

For quite a few years now I’ve been wanting to do something different with my time-lapse films. I love color. Storms are full of color. The blues, the greens, the warm oranges and reds at sunset. The colors are sometimes what make a simple storm into something extra special.

But black and white speaks to my soul. I love it. There is something when you remove the color that lets you truly see the textures, movement and emotion of a storm.

All shots were captured with a Canon EOS 5Ds R, EOS 5D Mark III, and EF 11-24mm, Ef 16-35, 35mm, 50mm and 135mm lenses. Processed using Lightroom, LR Timelapse, After Effects and Premiere Pro. You can follow Mike Olbinski on his site, and on TwitterFacebook, and Instagram.

Another marvellous time-lapse of New York

eos 550dLet’s start the new year with this post. This is the fourth time I feature a work by photographer and artist Ynon Lan (1 | 2 | 3). He has his very own way to make artistic time-lapse videos, and he does it without fancy or expensive gear. Still NYC #2 is his latest work.

Says Ynon:

Time, trains and buildings get tangled up in this short experimental stop motion film.
The film is comprised of over 600 photos and videos shot at different areas all around New York City.

All ambient sounds and sound effects were recorded on location. Ynon used a Canon EOS 550D/Rebel T2i and most of the time a EF-S 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM lens.

[via Ynon Lan]

“Fall Campfire” stop motion shows how well simple tricks can work out when used in a smart way

Ok, the post title is a little complex but I wanted to capture your attention for Israeli artist, director and animator Ynon Lan‘s video, Fall Campfire. It’s just 30 seconds but it will let you with a smile. Ynon Lan used a Canon EOS 550D to make the video.

I featured other works by Ynon Lan previously, a somewhat different time-lapse of New York City and Still NYC, where he assembled 330 pictures out of 3600 to make a somewhat different timelapse of New York City.

You can follow Ynon on his site, Behance, Instagram, and Vimeo.

This experimental timelapse was shot using two EOS 5D Mark III side by side to get extra wide angle and no distortion

panola

From time to time I like to feature timelapse videos that in my opinion stand out from the pack. Pano LA is a time-lapse by Joe Capra that has it all: it’s a well working and interesting experimental setup and it’s visually beautiful.

What makes this timelapse of Los Angeles different from others is the setup. By using two Canon EOS 5D Mark III cameras side-by-side on a custom rig, Joe gets a very wide angle of view without the distortion that usually comes as side effect when using wide angle lenses. He used longer lenses to shoot the time-lapse, i.e. two Canon EF 24-70mm f/2.8L, two EF 24-105mm f/4L IS and two EF 70-200mm f/2.8. If you watch the video below, you’ll see how well the compression effect of the longer lenses works for the panoramic rendering.

In joe Capra’s words:

Shooting Pano LA has been the most ambitious, challenging, demanding, and rewarding project I have worked on to date. It was shot over a period of two years entirely in true panoramic form using two synced DSLR cameras side by side. The resulting panoramic timelapse footage comes in at a whopping 10K x 4K resolution when stitched. I did not shoot this film to achieve the extreme resolution. I shot it for the panoramic look, especially the compressed look you get when using long lenses.

Shooting panoramic timelapse was something I had always wanted to do. I love panoramic images and wanted to bring that look to timelapse, and I wanted to do it proper, not by faking it by just cropping the top and bottom of regular timelapse shots. I gave it a try many years ago but was never able to get the images from the two cameras to sync properly and get the images to stitched together correctly.

Along with the custom rig, Joe used RamperPro to control flickering and day to night transitions. For motion control he used a custom motion controller with Kessler Crane TLS with Second Shooter.

Kudos!

[via DIY Photography]