Canon Powershot G9 X Mark II Review (ePhotozine)

Canon Powershot G9 X Mark II Review (ePhotozine)

Canon PowerShot G9 X Mark II: Amazon | B&H Photo | Digitalrev | eBay | Adorama | Canon USA

At a glance:

  • 1.0-inch, 20.1 Megapixel* High-sensitivity CMOS Sensor.
  • DIGIC 7 Image Processor.
  • Ultra-slim, Lightweight and Pocket-size Camera.
  • Built-in Wi-Fi®**, NFC*** and Bluetooth®^.
  • Bright f/2.0 (W) – f/4.9 (T), 3x Optical Zoom Lens (28–84mm).
  • 3.0-inch Touch Panel LCD.
  • Full HD, Dynamic IS and Time-Lapse Movie Video Functions.
  • Continuous Shooting Speeds of up to 8.2 fps.
  • Picture Style Function.
  • In-camera RAW Conversion

The folks at ePhotozine posted their full Canon Powershot G9 X Mark II review. From the conclusion:

The Canon Powershot G9 X Mark II is compact and stylish, and one of the smallest cameras available that delivers high image quality, thanks to the use of a 1inch BSI CMOS sensor. Having to use the 3inch touch-screen to change controls may not be to everyone’s liking, but if you’re looking for something compact that can deliver great image quality, then it’s worth the compromise. The use of a 3x optical zoom lens helps keep the camera small, whilst providing a wide-angle equivalent to 28mm. For those that want more zoom, or wider lens, then you would need to look at the larger G7 X Mark II.

The PowerShot G9 X Mark II is a little powerhouse that gets a lot of positive reviews. Definitely an interesting compact camera.

Canon EOS 77D sample pictures (DPReview)

eos 77d

Canon EOS 77D at a glance:

  • 24.2MP APS-C CMOS Sensor
  • DIGIC 7 Image Processor
  • 3.0″ 1.04m-Dot Vari-Angle Touchscreen
  • Full HD 1080p Video Recording at 60 fps
  • 45-Point All Cross-Type Phase-Detect AF
  • Dual Pixel CMOS AF
  • Up to 6 fps Shooting and ISO 51200
  • Built-In Wi-Fi with NFC, Bluetooth
  • Top LCD and Rear Quick Control Dial
  • RGB+IR 7560-Pixel Metering Sensor

DPReview posted a set of 65 sample pictures shot with the new Canon EOS 77D. The EOS 77D is expected to start shipping next week.

Canon EOS 77D: Amazon | B&H Photo | Digitalrev | eBay | Adorama | Canon USA

Fujifilm GFX 50s not worth the extra money over a full-frame DSLR, says DPReview

Fujifilm GFX 50s Not Worth The Extra Money Over A Full-frame DSLR, Says DPReview

Fujifilm GFX 50s at a glance:

  • 51.4MP 43.8 x 32.9mm CMOS Sensor
  • X-Processor Pro Image Processor
  • Removable 3.69m-Dot OLED EVF
  • 3.2″ 2.36m-Dot Tilting Touchscreen LCD
  • 117-Point Contrast-Detection AF System
  • Extended ISO 50-102400, 3 fps Shooting
  • Full HD 1080p Video Recording at 30 fps
  • Multi Aspect Ratio Shooting
  • Film Simulation Modes
  • Weather-Sealed Magnesium Alloy Body

This will come as shock for the many Fuji fans. The latest Fuji product, the medium format, mirrorless Fujifilm GFX 50s, is not worth the extra money you have to pay over a full-frame DSLR. That’s what photographic authority DPReview says.

Our friends at Fuji Rumors summed it up:

  • Low Light noise performance: Current Full Frame systems offer faster lenses than the GFX, so you’ll get less low light noise with FF. Moreover the FF sensor technology like Sony’s back-illumited sensor allows to catch up with MF since “sensor is better able to use the light projected onto it
  • Base ISO Dynamic Range: The Nikon has the ISO 64 mode. “Each pixel can hold more total charge before clipping, relative to equally-sized pixels on any other sensor in a consumer camera. That means it can tolerate a longer exposure at ISO 64, longer enough (at least 2/3 EV, or 60% more light) to capture as much total light as the 68% larger sensor in the GFX 50S exposed at its base ISO (100). […] noise performance at ISO 64 rivals many current medium format cameras their base ISOs
  • Shallow Depth-of-Field: The GFX lenses are not as fast as the fastest FF lenses, so they have less shallow DOF
  • Resolution: Resolution-wise, they simply can’t imagine anything better than the Canon 5DS R paired with truly stellar lenses. However, they also add that “larger sensors will always tend to out-resolve smaller sensors with equivalent glass. And so this is the area where we most expect to see an advantage to the Fujifilm system, especially over time as we approach 100MP, and beyond. It’s probably easier for a F1.8 prime paired with the GFX 50S to out-resolve a F1.4 prime on a 5DS R when both systems are shot wide open, but whether that will be the case (or if Fujifilm will even make a F1.8 or brighter prime for the system) remains to be seen. I certainly don’t think it would be a cheap combination.”

As you can see, the available ecosystem (i.e. lenses!) plays an important role for DPreview’s reviewer. I guess that must hurt for some people. Being a medium format camera, the Fujifilm GFX 50s comes with a corresponding price tag, $6,499. The price of the full-frame Canon EOS 5Ds is below $3000, and you can use some of the world’s best lenses, so it isn’t difficult to understand why DPReview gave such a statement.

Canon Rebel T7i (EOS 800D) sample shots and first impression

Canon Rebel T7i (EOS 800D) Sample Shots And First Impression

Canon Rebel T7i at a glance:

  • 24.2MP APS-C CMOS Sensor
  • DIGIC 7 Image Processor
  • 3.0″ 1.04m-Dot Vari-Angle Touchscreen
  • Full HD 1080p Video Recording at 60 fps
  • 45-Point All Cross-Type Phase-Detect AF
  • Dual Pixel CMOS AF
  • Up to 6 fps Shooting and ISO 51200
  • Built-In Wi-Fi with NFC, Bluetooth
  • HDR Movie and Time-Lapse Movie
  • Movie Electronic IS, Feature Assistant

Some Canon Rebel T7i news (the Rebel T7i is EOS 800D in Europe). Photography Blog posted a set of sample photos shot with the new Rebel T7i, along with sone first impression thoughts (emphasis mine):

Given the chance to test the camera in challenging low-contrast light conditions, we can report that our first impressions are very good. Image quality is respectable under tough conditions and excellent when the light entering the camera is maximised.

An excellent feature set in a lightweight body with simple layout means the EOS 800D is likely to entice beginners to further explore the world of interchangeable lens cameras.

With dual pixel CMOS auto focus and effective 5-axis stabilisation, the EOS 800D bridges a gap between photo-oriented DSLRs and mirrorless system cameras more suited to video functions.

Perhaps the most impressive aspects of the EOS 800D are its image quality, powerful performance through Canon’s DIGIC 7 processor and its versatile handling through the live view mode of the articulated rear touchscreen.

They posted also a set of sample photos shot with the Canon Rebel T7i (JPG, RAW, movies). Want to see more sample pics? ephotozine posted another set of sample photos shot with the new Rebel T7i.

It seems Canon made a lot right with the company’s latest entry-level DSLR. The feature set is impressing for a Rebel-class DSLR, the image quality is excellent, there is Dual Pixel AF, and more. Hard not to like this new Canon DSLR.

Canon Rebel T7i: Amazon | B&H Photo | Digitalrev | eBay | Adorama | Canon USA

Canon PowerShot G9 X Mark II Review (Photography Blog)

Canon PowerShot G9 X Mark II Review (Photography Blog)

Canon PowerShot G9 X Mark II: Amazon | B&H Photo | Digitalrev | eBay | Adorama | Canon USA

At a glance:

  • 1.0-inch, 20.1 Megapixel* High-sensitivity CMOS Sensor.
  • DIGIC 7 Image Processor.
  • Ultra-slim, Lightweight and Pocket-size Camera.
  • Built-in Wi-Fi®**, NFC*** and Bluetooth®^.
  • Bright f/2.0 (W) – f/4.9 (T), 3x Optical Zoom Lens (28–84mm).
  • 3.0-inch Touch Panel LCD.
  • Full HD, Dynamic IS and Time-Lapse Movie Video Functions.
  • Continuous Shooting Speeds of up to 8.2 fps.
  • Picture Style Function.
  • In-camera RAW Conversion.

Photography Blog posted their complete Canon PowerShot G9 X Mark II review. They gave the PowerShot G9 X Mark II a score of 4.5 out of 5.

In the conclusion they write:

Although owners of the original Canon PowerShot G9 X aren’t going to be too excited by the improvements on offer, the new Mark II does represent a minor step forward for Canon’s most pocket-friendly compact camera, particularly in its operational speed.

Continuous shooting rates, auto-focusing speed and general all-round performance have been boosted by the impressive Digic 7 processor, while image quality at high ISOs is subsequently slightly better too. Improved image stabilisation and slightly longer battery life are also desirable features, while the new always-on Bluetooth connection is a welcome addition.

Read the review at Photography Blog.

Irix 11mm f/4 video review

Irix 11mm

Irix 11mm f/4 Firefly

The Irix 11mm f/4, manufactured by TH Swiss and not shipping yet, is a highly anticipated lens. Christopher Frost Photography posted a pretty informative, 10 minutes video-review of the Firefly version of the Irix 11mm f/4 (the other, more rugged one is Blackstone). He used a Canon EOS 6D and an EOS M3 to test the Irix 11mm f/4.

 

Irix 11mm f/4 specifications after the break

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