Debunking a myth: why Sony’s full-frame mirrorless cameras aren’t what Sony wants you to believe

Size advantage? Sony A7R vs Canon EOS 5Ds R (right), both with a 85mm lens.

Size advantage? Sony A7R vs Canon EOS 5Ds R (right), both with a 85mm lens (image courtesy of Camera Size)

I came over a very interesting and educated article at PetaPixel. It’s about why Sony’s full frame pro mirrorless was a fatal mistake that can’t hold up to the promises.

The article analyses five of the apparent advantages a full-frame mirrorless camera is supposed to have for the professional photographer, and systematically debunks those myths. A full-frame mirrorless camera is supposed to have the advantage of

  • Compactness
  • Weight
  • In-Body Image Stabilization
  • You can adapt non-native lenses
  • Live Exposure Preview

Well, it’s not as easy as Sony tries to sell it. The supposed advantages fail to deliver in the real world.. In the conclusion the author says:

So we find ourselves returning for the last time to the original question: what is the point of professional grade FF mirrorless? It isn’t for the compactness (beyond shooting with just one pancake type lens), certainly not for the faster autofocus, not for faster frame rates, not for EVF/exposure preview, not for access to a high cost-performance lens habitat, not for manual focus peaking, not for the ergonomics, and almost universally not for the sake of adapting lenses.

When it comes to FF professional grade mirrorless, the answer is that there is little or no point. People are buying into it because it is an irrational fad. You end up having to buy lots of big and expensive lenses for the one tiny body, when it is preferable to have lots of smaller lenses for the one big body, since the total lens-body combination is the same anyway due to physics. In actual fact the lens-body combination makes professional grade FF mirrorless multi-lens packages larger overall. Read the article…

An article that’s definitely worth to be read before you waste your money for something that will turn out not to be what you expected and what you have been told. Better go for serious gear.

[via PetaPixel]

How to disassemble a Canon PowerShot G1 X Mark II

Ifixit, a site well known for tearing apart all kind of devices, posted a very detailed guide about how to disassemble the Canon PowerShot G1 X Mark II. While I do not reccomend you dismantle your new PowerShot G1 X Mark II, this is a usfeul guide for those who want to know how the G1 X Mark II is build, and for those having the skills to do some difficilut repair.

You can watch the interactive guide above, or follow the teardown on Ifixit.

Canon PowerShot G1 X Mark II: Amazon | B&H Photo | Digitalrev | eBay | Adorama | Canon USA

powershot g1 x mark ii

Jaw-dropping light paintings made with 24 Canon EOS 5D Mark II cameras

Jaw-dropping Light Paintings Made With 24 Canon EOS 5D Mark II Cameras

Photographer Patrick Rochon used 24 Canon EOS 5D Mark II cameras mounted on a custom build rig and connected to four computers to create the spectacular light paintings you can see in the video below.

The Phoblographer posted an interview with Patrick Rochon where he talks about the idea, and the technical challenges that had to be managed. The project was realised in Thailand.

Breaking: Nikon will soon announce a rebranded Canon EOS 80D

EOS 80D

This is breaking news!

The Canon EOS 80D is such a incredibly powerful camera that Nikon decided there is no point in trying to make something better. They decided to rebrand it, and to sell it as “Nikon EOS 80D”. The news leaked first on a Hong Kong newspaper.

This move comes after Nikon, in what appears to be a desperate attempt to look good, used a Fuji camera to advertise their products.

We are waiting for more news to come soon…