July 14, 2014
Tags: ,
Posted in Rumors

Canon EOS 7D Replacement Will Push Dual Pixel AF To New Levels

EOS 7D ReplacementEOS 7D Replacement 

Whatever Canon is going to announce on September 5th (the most likely announcement date) it will be something groundbreaking. Most rumor sites, CW included, think there will be an entirely new sensor technology that is coming. Recent patents filed by Canon point to Foveon-like sensors (3 patents in a row), one patent refers to a 5-layer sensor.

Details about the sensor technology Canon is supposed to announce are by now in the realm of pure speculation, no serious specs have leaked so far. However, I have been told (thanks) that the EOS 7D replacement will not just feature Canon’s Dual Pixel CMOS Auto-Focus, it will push its capabilities to new boundaries. We had a patent that points in this direction, i.e. to the next evolutive step of the Dual Pixel AF technology. It is also pretty plausible that Dual Pixel AF will show all its power with a new generation of CPUs. This fits with the rumors stating that the EOS 7D replacement will feature very advanced functionalities for videography, since Dual Pixel AF delivers a lot for videographers.

This rumor sounds very credible to me. Dual Pixel AF is a major milestone in Canon’s technological sensor evolution. And Dual Pixel AF is for sure not relegated to the more affordable Canon DSLRs (as the EOS 70D, where it was first implemented): Canon didn’t waste time in offering it also on the professional-graded EOS C100 and C300 (where it was already implemented on the sensor but had to be unlocked via firmware). Dual Pixel AF is a technology we will see in many future Canon cameras, and hopefully eventually also on a serious mirrorless camera.

Note that I prefer to use the definition “EOS 7D replacement” instead of “EOS 7D Mark II”. For the time being there are no hints it will be the next iteration of the 7D, pertinent rumors surfaced in the past.

Stay tuned, there will be more and more leaks in the next weeks.

 

July 14, 2014
Posted in patents

Canon Patent For Foveon Sensor With Anti-Reflection Film

Foveon Sensor

Egami (translated) spotted another highly interesting patent filed by Canon. The patent refers to a 3 layer, Foveon-like sensor with an insulator film applied. The film helps reduce reflection and flares.Very interesting patent, and not the first of this kind we report about, similar patents showed up in the past (here and here).

This is the third Canon patent about a Foveon-like sensor I am featuring here on CW. I think to start that such a sensor technology is definitely on Canon’s plans.

  • Patent Publication No. 2014-130890
    • Publication date 2014.7.10
    • Filing date 2012.12.28
  • Multilayer sensor drawback of
    • G is light, the image quality is degraded and reflected by the surface of the layer between the G and B layer, re-enters the B layer
  • Canon patents
    • The provision of the dielectric film and the insulating film as an anti-reflection film
    • First insulating layer, B layer, a dielectric film, insulating film, dielectric film, G layer, a dielectric film, insulating film, insulating film, dielectric film, the R layer
    • By increasing the thickness of the dielectric film, to suppress the multiple reflection
    • The dielectric film is between the G layer and B layer, the reflectance with respect to G is lower than B
July 12, 2014
Posted in Deals

All New Canon Rebates In One Place

Canon Rebates

All new Canon rebates (expiring 8/2) are listed at B&H. You can easily put together your bundle for the best possible final price. The discounts consist in instant rebates and mail-in rebates.

Savings are particularly massive for the EOS 7D and 7D kits (up to $600 instant discount):

July 12, 2014
Tags:
Posted in Deals

Deal Alert: Canon EOS 7D – $795

  Top Rated Plus seller 6ave (99.3% positive ratings) on eBay has the Canon EOS 7D on sale for $794.99. More than $200 less than on Amazon.

Free shipping and limited quantity.

July 12, 2014
Tags:
Posted in News

10 Canon 400mm Lenses Used To Detect The Faint Structures Of The Universe

Canon 400mm
The Dragonfly with 8 lenses mounted – image © Dunlap Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics

Thanks Chris

Dragonfly is a project by the Dunlap Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics in Toronto, Canada. It consists in a multi-lens array designed for ultra-low surface brightness astronomy at visible wavelengths. It uses 10 commercially available Canon 400mm lenses. The lenses in the picture above seem to be Canon EF 400mm f/5.6L USM lenses.

The project was commissioned in 2013. The lens array should be capable of detecting the obscure and utterly complex structures that can be found around a galaxy:

According to Cold Dark Matter (CDM) cosmology, structure in the Universe grows from the “bottom up”, with small galaxies merging to form larger ones. Evidence of such mergers can be seen in faint streams and filaments visible around the Milky Way Galaxy and the nearby M31 galaxy.

Dragonfly is used to find those structures. How does it work?

Dragonfly is designed to reveal the faint structure by greatly reducing scattered light and internal reflections within its optics. It achieves this using ten, commercially available Canon 400mm lenses with unprecedented nano-fabricated coatings with sub-wavelength structure on optical glasses.

The Dragonfly project is funded by DAA Prof. Roberto Abraham’s NSERC Discovery Grant, with initial funds provided by the Dunlap Institute and Yale University, and an NSERC equipment grant awarded in 2013.

For more information head over to the Dunlap Institute’s site.

 

 

July 12, 2014
Posted in News

Canon Supports National Center for Missing & Exploited Children

National Center for Missing & Exploited Children

Canon press release:

Canon U.S.A. Stands in Support of the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children at Yankee Stadium

Annual Canon Promotional Night Shows Commitment to Protecting Our Children

MELVILLE, N.Y., July 10, 2014 - Canon U.S.A., Inc., a leader in digital imaging solutions, hosted the Company’s annual Promotional Night at Yankee Stadium on July 1 with the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children and the New York Yankees. During a pre-game ceremony before the Yankees’ game against Tampa Bay, Ana Tavares, vice president, Finance & Accounting, Canon U.S.A., presented John Walsh, co-founder of NCMEC and John Arnos, NCMEC advisor, with a check in the amount of $508,213, representing the cumulative total of monetary and product donations Canon assisted in raising in 2014. As part of the celebration, the first 18,000 fans that entered the stadium received a Canon and Yankees branded baseball cap.

“Each year we enjoy Canon Promotional Night at Yankee Stadium with the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children and the New York Yankees because it is a night where we celebrate the efforts made to help bring missing children home,” said Kotaro Fukushima, senior director and general manager, Corporate Communications, Canon U.S.A. “Canon has been a sponsor of NCMEC for over 15 years and is proud to continue to support their mission of reuniting children with their loved ones.”

“We’re so grateful to Canon for its commitment to child safety and the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children,” said John Ryan, president and CEO, NCMEC. “They’ve been a dedicated partner for 17 years, providing technical and financial support that I know has helped save lives and reunite families, and I look forward to continuing that work with Canon by our side.”

Since 1997, Canon and NCMEC have worked together to raise awareness about the issue of missing and exploited children through the Canon4Kids program. As part of the Canon4Kids program, Canon has donated more than 2,200 pieces of equipment, including digital cameras, fax machines, printers and scanners, which have been distributed to law enforcement agencies in all 50 states, Puerto Rico and Guam. The program educates parents and guardians about how a current digital photograph is one of the most important tools to help locate a missing child.

For more information about the Canon4Kids program, visitwww.usa.canon.com/Canon4Kids.

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