Let’s talk color science: Canon EOS 5D Mark IV vs Sony A7R III video-comparison

Sony A7R IIIvs EOS 5D Mark IV

Sony A7R III vs Canon EOS 5D Mark IV – Which one has better colors?

 

Photographer and reviewer Dustin Abbott posted a 13 minutes video where he compares color rendering of the Canon EOS 5D Mark IV () and Sony A7R III ().

Canon’s color rendering is generally considered the most accurate in the digital photography world, especially when it comes to skin tones. Can the Sony A7R III hold up to the EOS 5D Mark IV? Dustin tests the color rendering on difficult subjects, like metal surfaces etc, and on everyday subjects. And can you get Canon colors out of a Sony, with some tweaking?  See for yourself.

[via Dustin Abbott]

Why photographer Armando Ferreira switched from Sony to Canon

Contrary to what most most Sony fan sites want you to believe, there are many photographers who switch from Sony to Canon, or who switch to Sony and deeply regret it.

Photographer Armando Ferreira explains why he made the switch from using Sony cameras like the Sony A7RII and also the Sony A7SII to the Canon 5D Mark IV.

Because Canon gear works as advised, maybe…?

Off Brand News: Sony a7R III is best performing MILC at DxOMark (scores 100)

Sony A7R III

Sony A7R III at a glance:

  • 42MP Full-Frame Exmor R BSI CMOS Sensor
  • BIONZ X Image Processor & Front-End LSI
  • 399-Point AF System & 10 fps Shooting
  • UHD 4K30p Video with HLG & S-Log3 Gammas
  • 3.69m-Dot Tru-Finder OLED EVF
  • 3.0″ 1.44m-Dot Tilting Touchscreen LCD
  • 5-Axis SteadyShot INSIDE Stabilization
  • ISO 102400 & Pixel Shift Multi Shooting
  • Built-In Wi-Fi/Bluetooth, Dual SD Slots
  • USB 3.1 Gen 1 Type-C Port & PC Sync Port

The folks over at DxOMark put the Sony A7R III on their test bench. Well, the A7R III scores 100, same as the Nikon D850. Only the medium format Hasselblad X1D-50c and Pentax 645Z have a higher score (102 and 101, respectively).

From DxOMark’s conclusion:

It’s clear that the Sony A7R III has a high-performing sensor that’s capable of capturing images with a broad range of color and tone, while keeping noise well under control.

However, comparing the A7R III sensor to the Nikon D850’s reveals the advantage that the Nikon camera’s lower minimum sensitivity (ISO) value brings. Photographers who predominantly shoot in bright light or capture motionless subjects with the camera on a tripod will record the most information, be it color, tone, or detail with the Nikon D850 set to ISO 32. However, if they require values above that, the Sony A7R III sensor produces marginally better images.

Sony’s in-body 5-axis image stabilization system is widely respected, and if it achieves the 5.5 EV shutter speed compensation in the A7R III that the company claims, it would enable the camera to capture images at ISO 100 instead of at ISO 3200 (provided the subject is stationary). Read the review…

sony a7r iii
The Canon DSLRs with the highest DxOMark score are the Canon EOS-1D X Mark II (88) and EOS 5Ds (87). Once more, Sony is showing how well they manage to design and build image sensors.

So, Canon, have you ever heard about this company, Sony? You know, they make amazing hardware with shitty interfaces and beta software on it. But, hey!, they innovate and users love them gadgets and gear. Maybe, Canon, you should consider catching up. Maybe. Just my 2 cents.

Sony A7R III: Amazon US, Adorama, B&H Photo.

Sony a9 focus tracking not working when used with Canon lenses

Sony a9

Sony a9

Sony a9: Amazon, B&H Photo, Digitalrev, eBay, Adorama, KEH Camera, Canon USA

At a glance:

  • 24.2MP Full-Frame Stacked CMOS Sensor
  • BIONZ X Image Processor & Front-End LSI
  • 693-Point AF System & 20 fps Shooting
  • Blackout-Free Quad-VGA 3.7m-Dot OLED EVF
  • Internal UHD 4K Video Recording
  • 5-Axis SteadyShot INSIDE Stabilization
  • 3.0″ 1.44m-Dot Tilting Touchscreen LCD
  • ISO 204,800, Silent Electronic Shutter
  • Built-In Wi-Fi/Bluetooth, Dual SD Slots
  • Integrated LAN and PC Sync Terminals

The Sony a9 is touted as the Jack of all Trades. Impressive specs, and a lot of hype coming from a devoted fan community.

However, all that glitters is not gold. The video below, shot with a Sony a9 using a $9000 Canon EF 500mm f/4 lens on a Sigma MC-11 adapter, isn’t so impressive after all. The Sony a9 is not able to track focus after the shutter has been fired. The Sony a9 just started shipping so we don’t know if this phenomenon is limited to adapted Canon lenses (guess it is).

If you are a professional photographer, stick with Canon and Nikon and stay safe with proven gear and great and reliable professional service. If you have money to waste for gadgets, get a Sony a9. The specs are truly impressive and once more show how much Sony is pushing technological innovation.

[Via Sony Alpha Rumors]

All that glitters is not gold: Sony A9 not ISO-invariant and sacrifices dynamic range for speed

Sony A9

Sony a9 at a glance:

  • 24.2MP Full-Frame Stacked CMOS Sensor
  • BIONZ X Image Processor & Front-End LSI
  • 693-Point AF System & 20 fps Shooting
  • Blackout-Free Quad-VGA 3.7m-Dot OLED EVF
  • Internal UHD 4K Video Recording
  • 5-Axis SteadyShot INSIDE Stabilization
  • 3.0″ 1.44m-Dot Tilting Touchscreen LCD
  • ISO 204,800, Silent Electronic Shutter
  • Built-In Wi-Fi/Bluetooth, Dual SD Slots
  • Integrated LAN and PC Sync Terminals

There is no free lunch and anything comes at a price. This appears to be true especially for Sony gear, always hyped and most of the time only because of the specifications sheets.

DPReview wanted to know better. They put the Sony a9 on their test bench, and found some interesting things. So, how does the powerhouse a9 perform when it comes to ISO-invariance (what is it?) and dynamic range.

DPReview found out that the Sony a9 is not ISO-invariant, and that “the camera is adding a fair amount of read noise that results in noisy shadows, limiting dynamic range at base ISO“. They also found that the Sony A9 sensor “was likely optimized for speed at the expense of low ISO dynamic range“.

What does all this mean? According to DPReview “this limits the exposure latitude of a9 Raws, so you’ll have some limited ability to expose high contrast scenes for the highlights, then tonemap (raise) shadows in post“.

All that glitters is not gold. Read DPReview’s in-depth analysis.