“NYC Textures” is a hypnotic stop motion video of patterns you see in New York City

ynon lan

I’m happy to feature a new work by NYC based artist Ynon Lan.

Ynon Lan is a director and animator living in New York City. In his work he enjoys combining photography, videography and different animation techniques in inventive ways. His latest stop motion video, the one we are featuring here, was shot over a period of two weeks. Ynon walked around different areas of Manhattan and shot thousands of photos of the most interesting textures. In his own words:

Once you start walking around a big city like [NYC] looking for unique textures, you can’t help but noticing this endless variety.

I think a whole video could have been made on the different types of bricks alone.

The project started with a short experiment Ynon shot on his iPhone in a subway station and then uploaded on his Instagram profile. The results were promising and so he started the “NYC Textures” project, using the same concept and techniques. After over thousand photos shot the video was ready to be made. All ambient sounds you here in the video were recorded on location.

Last but not least: Ynon doesn’t use fancy or expensive gear to realise his ideas. He uses a Canon EOS 550D and the EF-S 18-135mm kit lens. Kudos!

You can follow Ynon Lan on Instagram, Vimeo, or you can visit his website.

We featured other works by Ynon Lan in the past:

Shooting the Aurora Borealis with Canon EOS 5D Mark IV and 6D Mark II (and pushing ISO to the limits)

aurora borealis

Astronomy and night sky photographer Phil Hart made two beautiful clips of the Aurora Borealis in Canada’s Yukon Territory. The results are beautiful and have a touch of magic.

To shot both Aurora Borealis clips, Phil Hart used a Canon EOS 5D Mark IV (price & specs) and an EOS 6D Mark II (price & specs) and fast Sigma ART lenses. With the EOS 5D Mark IV he  captured 1080p video at the camera’s maximum 32000 ISO setting. 4K video on the EOS 5D Mark IV didn’t work out well for Phil: the combination of the 1.7x crop factor and significant reduction in maximum allowable ISO speed were the bottlenecks. He used the EOS 6D Mark II to shoot 4K time-lapse video.

First, have a look at the mesmerising clips below.

Phil Hart tells the story of both clips on his site, with many details on his workflow.

[via PetaPixel]

“NYC Layer-Lapse” is an amazing display of New York City (and shot with Canon gear)

Layer-lapse

We featured other works by time-lapse photographer Julian Tryba in the last years. Tryba’s latest effort is a layer-lapse of New York City, NYC Layer-Lapse.

You may wonder what a “layer-lapse” is. Julian Tryba describes it as follows:

Traditional time-lapses are constrained by the idea that there is a single universal clock. In the spirit of Einstein’s relativity theory, layer-lapses assign distinct clocks to any number of objects or regions in a scene. Each of these clocks may start at any point in time, and tick at any rate. The result is a visual time dilation effect known as layer-lapse.

You have to watch the video to grasp the idea entirely.

To realize NYC Layer-Lapse Julian Tryba made 22 trips to New York, spent 352 hours filming, paid $1,430 in Parking Fees, drove 9,988 miles, and took 232,000 pictures. As you can see this is way more than a weekend project. He used five Canon DSLRs (Canon EOS 5Ds, EOS 5D Mark III, EOS 5D Mark II, EOS 6D, EOS 7D), a Sony A7rii, and a bunch of lenses (Canon 200-400mm, Canon 100-400mm ii, Canon 70-200mm 2.8 ii, Canon 16-35mm 2.8 ii, Canon 24mm f1.4 ii, Canon 24-70mm 2.8 ii, Zeiss T* 50mm 1.4, Canon 135mm f2, Sony G 16-35mm 2.8, Canon 24-105mm, Rokinon 20mm 1.8).

NYC Layer-Lapse is not your usual time-lapse clip, it is a work of art born from passion and hours of work. More about how it was made can be read here. Kudos!

Monsoon IV is new jaw-dropping time-lapse of North-American storms (shot with Canon EOS 5DS R)

Mike Olbinski

Another great work by storm chaser Mike Olbinski (other works we featured).

Mike describes his latest effort:

This year I ventured far and wide. Phoenix never saw a good dust storm all summer, but I still was able to capture a few good ones in southwest portions of the state. The cover photo for this film was halfway to Yuma standing in the middle of Interstate 8 watching an ominous wall of dust roll down the highway towards me with lightning flashing behind it. It was an incredible moment.

One bonus this summer was a few successful chases up at the Grand Canyon. Finally. A couple of gorgeous sunsets, rain dumping into the Canyon, lightning at night, Milky Way…it all worked out and I’m stoked for the footage I captured there that made it into this film. I also ventured over into New Mexico twice to chase some wonderful, plains-like structure to end the monsoon this year.

All told I covered about 13,000 miles and chased as far west as Desert Center, CA, as far east as Wilna, NM and as far north as Tonelea, AZ. And two great storms down in Organ Pipe National Monument, which is only about 10 miles from Mexico.

[…]  I shot over 110,000 frames of time-lapse and likely only half of it ended up in the final cut. The editing has taken me weeks […]

Mike Olbinski used two Canon EOS 5DS R along with Canon 11-24mm, 35mm, 50mm, 135mm and Sigma Art 50mm lenses, and Manfrotto tripods. The final product was edited in Lightroom with LR Timelapse, After Effects and Premiere Pro. Enjoy!

“Pursuit” is storm chaser Mike Olbinski’s latest work (and it’s shot with Canon gear)

Mike olbinski

I featured previous works by Mike Olbinski, a talented videographer with a passion for chasing storms all over the United States.

PURSUIT (available in 4K and 8K) is Mike’s latest work. And it’s stunning and jawdropping, the way we are used by his movies. Writes Mike:

This past spring was a tough one. Supercell structure and beautiful tornadoes had been very hard to come by. In fact, the tornado in the opening of this film was the only good one I saw this entire year. I had been on the road longer than ever before. Driven more miles. I was away from my family for 12 straight days at one point, and when I got home, I had to tell them I was going back out 24 hours later for June 12th. It was just too good to pass up. It promised to be a day that I could get everything I had been hoping for this spring and I had no choice. My wife understood, even though I knew she wished I stayed home. And I wished it too

Blu-Ray discs are available here. The music is by Peter Nanasi. You can follow Mike Olbinski on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

Mike used two Canon 5DSR’s along with Canon 11-24mm, 35mm, 50mm, 135mm and Sigma Art 50mm lenses, and Manfrotto tripods. The final product was edited in Lightroom with LR Timelapse, After Effects and Premiere Pro.

This jaw-dropping video shows the full cloud inversion, a rare phenomenon in the Grand Canyon, and was shot with Canon gear

 

The amazing video above shows a rare phenomenon known as the full cloud inversion. Harun Mehmedinovic tells us what the phenomenon is about, and how they produced the video:

Millions of visitors a year come to Arizona’s Grand Canyon National Park, one of the seven natural wonders of the world and the most visited national park in the western United States. However, on extremely rare days when cold air is trapped in the canyon and topped by a layer of warm air, which in combination with moisture and condensation, form the phenomenon referred to as the full cloud inversion. In what resembles something between ocean waves and fast clouds, Grand Canyon is completely obscured by fog, making the visitors feel as if they are walking on clouds.

This video was filmed as part of SKYGLOW, an ongoing crowdfunded quest to explore the effects and dangers of urban light pollution in contrast with some of the most incredible dark sky areas in North America. This project is being produced in collaboration with International Dark-Sky Association, a non-profit fighting for the preservation of night skies around the globe.

Canon EOS 5Ds R and EOS 5D Mark III cameras and Canon lenses were used to shot the film, sponsored by Canon USA, aided by Alpine Labs‘ Michron & Pulse, powered by Paul C. Buff Vagabond Mini. LRTimelapse was used to process some of the shots.

Original video premiered on BBC Earth. High resolution stills can be found here.