Canon enters sensor business, three high performance sensors on sale, 120MP inclusive

Canon

Three of Canon’s most advanced and specialised sensors are on sale to the public. This is no surprise as it was reported to be part of Canon’s plans back in 2016.

The sensors are a 120 Megapixel CMOS Sensor, a 5 Megapixel Global Shutter CMOS, and the 35MMFHDXS, 19μm Full HD CMOS Sensor. If you’re curious to learn more click here. In the past we reported extensively about these sensors.

The sensors can be purchased through Canon’s own authorized distributor Phase 1 Technology Corp.

Canon industrial sensors redefine high-performance with state-of-the-art technology, backed by decades of ongoing development and improvement. Featuring the 120 Megapixel CMOS sensor, the 5 Megapixel Global Shutter CMOS sensor, and the 35MMFHDXS CMOS sensor, Phase 1 Technology offers Canon’s most advanced industrial sensors.

For OEMs, solutions providers, vision integrators and others in search of advanced machine vision components, Canon’s powerful industrial sensors are equipped for a wide range of applications.

These kind of sensor gets used in surveillance tech, medical applications, and other specialised domains. Below you see some videos highlighting Canon’s sensors technology and performance.

The original Canon EOS M can shoot 2.5K raw video with Magic Lantern, and it’s impressing

Canon Eos M

Warning: the sd_uhs module referenced below is currently highly experimental and can destroy your sd card or camera. There have been instances of sd cards breaking. Magic Lantern does not recommend its use at the moment because of the risk involved.

I’m reporting this because Magic Lantern‘s work deserves it, and because I’m an old school hacker and can’t help getting excited by stuff like this. Computer science was made by this sort of guys, not by fancy dudes like Apple’s or the likes. I’ve been there since the beginning and I am pretty sure to understand the value of what these skilled hackers are doing.

So, here is another amazing hack by the Magic Lantern team, showcased by Synth & Sundry in the video below. It’s truly impressing: a Magic Lantern SD UHS overclock hack test on a the first Canon EOS M (2013). Shot at 2520×1080, 5x zoom mode, 24 fps, 12 bit lossless compressed raw using sd_uhs module. Not bad, eh?

It may be true that Canon cripples their tech when they want it, but still, this code hacking proofs what Canon’s sensor tech can deliver. Even on the so much disgraced original Canon EOS M (which I still proudly own and never will get rid off).

Again: do not try this if you don’t exactly know what you are doing. This is experimental stuff and it may seriously harm your camera, I do not encourage you to try to apply this hack.

Kudos Magic Lantern for the hacking! If you dare and want to know more, have a look at Magic Lantern’s download page.



We covered Magic Lantern’s work, and they have a forum where you can learn more.

Canon to reframe the business, scared by further smartphone disruption, report suggests

Canon Rumors

Canon actively being worried about the future, and about what the smartphone (photographic) revolution could mean for the Japanese giant.

Marketing Week reports:

It is almost exactly a year since Canon relaunched its brand with the aim of making it “accessible” to a wider group of customers. The shift was predicated on a realisation that the organisation needed to move from being product-centric to more customer-centric, focusing more on how its cameras and printers meet consumers’ needs rather than shouting about the latest specs.

The most obvious sign of this was a TV ad [editor’s note: see below], ‘Live for the story’ created by VCCP, that positioned Canon as a storytelling brand. That was followed up by work with influencers such as Zoe Kravitz to tap into particular genres of photography, including family, travel and food.

“The underlying premise was how do we help you tell the best story of your life,” explains Lee Bonniface, marketing director at Canon Europe. “It’s an integration of the brand owning the space of storytelling and then the integration of our products and services to allow customer to be able to tell their story in the best way possible.

Canon EF 200-400mm f/4L IS Extender 1.4x lens firmware update released (ver. 1.1.0)

Canon EF 200-400mm F/4L

Canon released firmware ver. 1.1.0 for the Canon EF 200-400mm f/4L IS 1.4x lens.

Firmware Version 1.1.0 is incorporated with the following correction.

Corrects a phenomenon in which the subject may not be in focus on some occasions when using this lens with some camera models (*) and performing AF shooting from approximately 3m.

* Some camera models: EOS-1D X, Mark II, EOS-1D X, EOS-1D C, EOS 5Ds, EOS 5Ds R, EOS 5D Mark IV, EOS 5D Mark III

Download firmware 1.1.0 for the Canon EF 200-400mm f/4L IS Extender 1.4x.

Robots hand polish Canon’s L-series lenses, and 9 more facts about the Utsunomiya lens factory

Utsunomiya

The Utsunomiya lens factory in Japan is where all Canon L-series lenses are produced.

Sci-fi style robots, fault-hearing engineers, anti-static shoes – Canon’s Utsunomiya lens factory is a hotbed of innovation and precision. Canon’s L-series lenses are known around the world for their professional-quality build and sharp results, but to produce such outstanding lenses requires impressive levels of craftsmanship, attention to detail, and a few surprising practices.

Canon Europe posted a short and neat article with 10 (supposedly) unknown facts about Canon’s L lenses, and the Utsunomiya factory. These are:

  • Japanese engineering is everywhere
  • Lens experts can hear faults
  • Lens polishing tools are made with diamonds
  • Aspherical lenses are made by melting glass
  • Sci-fi robots roam the factory
  • Lens polishing machines self-correct
  • Lens measurements are incredibly precise
  • The hardest lens to make is…
  • The innovation never ends
  • Canon lenses could (probably) cover half the world

If you want to know more about the facts listed above (every point comes with text and pictures) and the Utsunomiya factory, I encourage you to head over to Canon Europe.

Another take on Canon’s and Nikon’s full frame mirrorless plans

Full Frame Mirrorless

FroKnowsPhoto (aka Jared Polin) shares his opinion and view on what Canon and Nikon will feature on their long rumored full frame mirrorless cameras. And obviously: how will they compare to Sony’s technology and offering? And how will Sony counter?

We expect Canon to announce their full frame mirrorless camera within the next 8 to 12 months. For the latest about it see here.

Stay tuned.