Lens Focus Breathing Explained, And Why You Should Care

Focus Breathing

Lens focus breathing. Ever heard about? According to Wikipedia:

[Lens] Breathing refers to the shifting of angle of view of a lens when changing the focus. Some (often higher quality) lenses are designed to lessen the degree of this effect. Lens breathing does not prevent one from racking focus or following focus with this lens, but it lessens the desirability of any type of focus adjustment, since it noticeably changes the composition of the shot. This is not to be confused with the suction and expulsion of air from within the lens as its internal volume changes.

Want it easier? DPReview TV to the rescue:

This Seriously Skilled Guy Watercooled A Canon EOS R5, And Then Found A Better Solution

Canon Eos R5

Here is a incredibly cool Canon EOS R5 hack, performed by a very talented guy with solid engineering skills (take this as a warning: don’t do it at home).

The guys behind DIY Perks have disassembled a Canon EOS R5 and applied a water-cooling system to the camera’s motherboard. Unlimited 8K recording time is achieved, no more overheating. However, the water-cooling hack as neat as it is, is a gimmick. These guys did far better.

Since a water cooled EOS R5 would be rather impractically out in the field, DIY Perks came up with a better idea and did some serious thermal engineering. They custom-made a copper heat sink and applied it with thermal paste (not thermal tape) to the CPU and DRAM chips on the camera’s motherboard. In environments that are not too hot this allows for continuous video recording without impairing the handling of the EOS R5. A small fan can be applied to the back of the R5 when it is used in warmer places. A professional looking solution that works.

The video below shows all steps and is very interesting. Kudos to the guys at DIY Perks.

Canon EOS R5 reviews are listed here, for EOS R6 reviews see here. The EOS R5 is highly regarded as a stills camera. In particular, the EOS R5 autofocus system seems to be huge leap forwards. User manual are available for download for the EOS R5 and the EOS R6.

Canon EOS R5:

America: B&H Photo, Adorama, Amazon USA, Amazon CA, KEH Camera, BestBuy, Canon CA, Canon USA
Europe & UK: Amazon DE, Amazon UK, Amazon FR, Amazon IT, Wex Photo Video, Park Cameras, Canon DE, Canon UK, Canon IT, Canon FR

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This Artificial Intelligence Powered Camera Describes What It Sees, With Its Own Voice (DIY project)

Artificial Intelligence

Machine learning algorithms are conquering the world. It’s not just now that they entered the photography domain.

This artificial intelligence application is a bit different from what comes in recent photo editing software. A Raspberry Pi is involved, along with a TensorFlow Lite object recognition software and Adafruit’s BrainCraft HAT machine learning system All together makes a very cool DIY project, described by Adafruit in an article.

[via DIY Photography]

Canon Mount Adapter EF-EOS R 0.71x Speedbooster Explained

EF-EOS R 0.71x

Here is a short video introducing the new Canon Mount Adapter EF-EOS R 0.71x, a speedbooster-like adpater to mount EF lenses on RF mount cameras. The Mount Adapter EF-EOS R 0.71x was announced along with the Canon EOS C70.

From Canon:

This adapter converts light transmission from full-frame to Super 35mm image format. It extends the angle of view and optical sensitivity, while seamlessly integrating with the camera’s optical corrections. mount adapter.

In addition to the flanges of the RF mount, four screws securely attach the adapter to the camera. Once mounted, the adapter maintains a similar angle of view of your full frame lenses on the Super 35mm sensor, while boosting the speed of the attached lens by an average of 1-stop. The adapter also carries all EF information through to the RF contacts, so on certain lenses, full DPAF and metadata will be available, working much as they do on a native EF mount.

Canon Develops Another Image Sensor That Can See In The Dark (0.08 lux!)

Canon

Canon’ research labs are continuously pushing the technological evolution of image sensors. Here is another one.

Spotted by Image Sensors World, and none else despite what it might seem, the Canon LI7050 is a new high-sensitivity CMOS sensor for network and industrial cameras that enables full-HD color video capture in 0.08 lux environments. Not bad, eh?

The Canon LI7050 is a specialized image sensor for industrial and other scientific applications. Another Canon sensor that can see in the dark, According to the experts at Image Sensors World:

Despite a compact pixel array of 1/1.8 inches and pixel size of 4.1 µm, Canon’s newly developed LI7050 sensor makes possible color video recording in low-light environments as dark as 0.08 lux.

Security cameras equipped with the LI7050 can capture video at night in such locations as public facilities, roads or transport networks, thereby helping to identify details including the color of vehicles or subjects’ clothing. What’s more, this compact, high-sensitivity sensor can be installed in cameras for such use cases as underwater drones, microscopes and wearable cameras for security personnel.

Canon’s new sensor is also equipped with an HDR drive function that realizes a wide DR of 120 dB. When recording in an environment with illumination levels between, for example, 0.08 lux and 80,000 lux, the sensor’s wide dynamic range enables video capture without blown-out whites and crushed blacks. During normal drive operation, the sensor realizes a noise level of 75 dB and captures video without blown-out whites and crushed blacks in environments with illumination levels between, for example, 0.08 lux and 500 lux.

Is there already someone claiming the sensor is overheating? If not, here is a video showing of the capabilities of this sensor. We think it’s impressing.

If you want to learn more about these highly specialized image sensors have a look at this listing.

Canon press release:

SINGAPORE, 3 August 2020 — Canon announced today the launch in Japan of the LI7050, a new 1/1.8-inch CMOS sensor capable of capturing color images in full-HD even in low-illumination environments as dark as 0.08 lux1.

The recent growth of IoT technologies has in turn generated increasing demand for network and industrial-use cameras—in particular, cameras capable of image capture in full-HD as well as nighttime color recording. Despite a compact body size of 1/1.8 inches and pixel size of 4.1 µm (micrometers), Canon’s newly developed LI7050 sensor makes possible color video recording in full-HD, even under low-light conditions.

The LI7050, while achieving a compact size, features a pixel architecture that enables high sensitivity, thereby making possible low-noise, full-HD color video recording in low-light environments as dark as 0.08 lux. Conventional nighttime monitoring employs infrared cameras and records video in monochrome. However, network cameras equipped with the LI7050 can capture video at night in such locations as public facilities, roads or transport networks, thereby helping to identify details including the color of vehicles or subjects’ clothing. What’s more, this compact, high-sensitivity sensor can be installed in cameras for such use cases as underwater drones, microscopes and wearable cameras for security personnel.

Canon’s new sensor is also equipped with an HDR drive function that realizes a wide dynamic range of 120 dB. When recording in an environment with illumination levels between, for example, 0.08 lux and 80,000 lux, the sensor’s wide dynamic range enables video capture without blown-out whites and crushed blacks. Thanks to this capability, the sensor enables cameras to record high-quality video, even when positioned at building entrances and other locations where there are significant variations in illumination levels. During normal drive operation, the sensor realizes a noise level of 75 dB and captures video without blown-out whites and crushed blacks in environments with illumination levels between, for example, 0.08 lux and 500 lux.
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​​​​​​​The LI7050 supports the MIPI CSI-2 interface utilized by a wide range of consumer and industrial-use cameras, thereby greatly expanding the number of possible equipment combinations. The sensor also meets a variety of industrial needs through such features as a Region of Interest (ROI) function that enables users to select regions to read from the sensor, reducing the amount of read information and allowing for image capture at an increased framerate, and the ability to configure horizontal and vertical inversion directly from the sensor for easy viewing of footage from cameras installed on ceilings and other inverted positions.
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​​​​​​​Canon has begun sample shipments of the LI7050 from today, and is scheduled to officially commence sales in late October 2020.

Canon Develops World’s First 1 Megapixel SPAD Image Sensor

SPAD Image Sensor

Canon’s research labs are developing the world’s first 1 megapixel SPAD image sensor, another highly specialized sensor for scientific applications.

The camera utilizing the sensor described in the press release below were jointly developed with scientists at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne. A scientific article was also published: Megapixel time-gated SPAD image sensor for 2D and 3D imaging applications

Canon press release:

TOKYO, June 24, 2020—Canon Inc. announced today that the company has developed the world’s first1 single photon avalanche diode (SPAD) image sensor with signal-amplifying pixels capable of capturing 1-megapixel images. SPAD image sensors are ideal for such applications as 2-dimensional cameras, which capture and develop still image and video in an extremely short span of time. These sensors also hold potential for use in 3-dimensional cameras due to their ability to obtain information about the distance between them and a subject as image data.

A SPAD sensor is a uniquely designed image sensor in which each pixel possesses an electronic element. When a single light particle, called a photon, reaches a pixel it is multiplied—as if creating an “avalanche”—that results in a single large electrical pulse. The ability to generate multiple electrons from a single photon provides such advantages as greater sensitivity during image capture and high precision distance measurement.

The SPAD image sensor developed by Canon overcomes the longstanding difficulties of achieving this effect with high pixel counts. By adopting new circuit technology, Canon’s sensor uses a method known as photon counting to realize a digital image resolution of 1 megapixel. What’s more, the sensor employs a global shutter that allows simultaneous control of exposure for every pixel. Exposure time can be shortened to as little as 3.8 nanoseconds2, making possible clear and distortion-free image capture. In addition, the sensor is capable of up to 24,000 frames per second (FPS) with 1 bit output, thus enabling slow-motion capture of fast movement within an extremely short time frame.

SPAD Image Sensor

Thanks to its ability to capture fine details for the entirety of events and phenomena, this technology holds the potential for use in a wide variety of fields and applications including clear, safe and durable analysis of chemical reactions, natural phenomena including lightning strikes, falling objects, damage upon impact and other events that can’t be observed with precision by the naked eye.

The sensor also features a high time resolution as precise as 100 picoseconds2, enabling it to determine the exact timing at which a photon reaches a pixel with ultra-high accuracy. Leveraging this functionality, the sensor is capable of Time of Flight distance measurement. What’s more, with a high resolution of 1 megapixel and high-speed image capture, it is also able to accurately perform 3D distance measurements in situations where multiple subjects overlap—useful in such scenarios as a vehicle distance measurement for self-driving automobiles and grasping 3D spatial information for xR3 and similar devices.

Canon’s development of a SPAD image sensor enables 3D cameras capable of recognizing depth information to achieve a resolution of 1 megapixel is expected to rapidly expand the use of such cameras as the “eyes” of high-performance robotic devices. Going forward, Canon will strive to anticipate the needs of industry by continuing to advance its innovative image sensor technology, further expand the possibilities of what is visible, spur evolution in science and industry through high-precision detection of information and contribute to the development of fields yet to be discovered.

[more about SPAD sensors after the break]
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