Canon Working On Global Shutter Sensor With Dual Memory Pixels, Research Paper

Global Shutter

Canon published a research paper in the Japanese Journal of Applied Physics, named “A 3.4 μm pixel pitch global shutter CMOS image sensor with dual in-pixel charge domain memory” (by Masahiro Kobayashi, Hiroshi Sekine, Takafumi Miki, Takashi Muto, Toshiki Tsuboi, Yusuke Onuki, Yasushi Matsuno, Hidekazu Takahashi, Takeshi Ichikawa, and Shunpike Inoue).

From the paper’s abstract:

In this paper, we describe a newly developed 3.4 μm pixel pitch global shutter CMOS image sensor (CIS) with dual in-pixel charge domain memories (CDMEMs) has about 5.3 M effective pixels and achieves 19 ke− full well capacity, 30 ke−/lxcenterdots sensitivity, 2.8 e- rms temporal noise, and −83 dB parasitic light sensitivity. In particular, we describe the sensor structure for improving the sensitivity and detail of the readout procedure. Furthermore, this image sensor realizes various readout with dual CDMEMs. For example, an alternate multiple-accumulation high dynamic range readout procedure achieves 60 fps operation and over 110 dB dynamic range in one-frame operation and is suitable in particular for moving object capturing. This front-side-illuminated CIS is fabricated in a 130 nm 1P4M with light shield CMOS process.

[via Image Sensors World]

How To Make A Working Lens Out Of Sand And Rocks

If you are particularly keen to difficult DIY projects, this one may be for you.

Andy George of How To Make Everything redefines the concept of DIY with this project: a lens build from scratch using raw sand, rocks, and metal, and a huge amount of skills too, I guess.

Previously, Andy built a pinhole camera, as you can see in the video below.

Not satisfied with the pinhole camera, Andy decided to build a lens from the scratch. Well, it took him a dozen attempts before getting it done right. Guess making your own glass isn’t everyone’s thing. The video below explains all steps. Enjoy.

[via Interesting Engineering via DIY Photography]

The Evolution Of Autofocus By Comparing Canon EOS R, Sony a7 III and Panasonic G9 Technology

Autofocus

We all know Canon has the best on sensor AF, Dual Pixel AF. But there are other AF technologies.

The video below by Gerald Undone compares the technology behind autofocus systems like Canon’s Dual Pixel AF in the new EOS R, the hybrid phase-detection in the Sony a7 III, and the Depth from Defocus Contrast Detection found in the Panasonic Lumix G9. Enjoy.

Canon EF 400mm f/2.8L IS III Teardown (Lens Rentals)

Canon EF 400mm

Roger Cicala and Aaron Closz of Lens Rentals disassembled the Canon EF 400mm f/2.8L IS III lens, a lens that costs like a used car.

From their conclusion:

The spring-loaded adjustable collar collection is something of a mystery to us and will remain so until we can spend some days doing optical adjustments on one. The use of the same motor as the RF lens is very interesting in several ways. Only some more tear downs will tell us if this is just a superior motor type that Canon is going to use in all electrically focused lenses (I suspect this is probably the case), or just in lenses with a lot of glass in the focusing element (another likely thing).

Canon has really been very quiet about this lens, despite the known changes inside. I had a lot of trouble finding out which elements are fluorite (two of them are, apparently). There has been some talk about improved focusing speed and accuracy, which I assume has something to do with the new electronic focus system, but not much.

The teardown is explained step by step with a lot of pictures, see it here.

All images © lensrentals.com and used with permission.

Canon EF 400mm f/2.8L IS III at a glance:

  • EF-Mount Lens/Full-Frame Format
  • Aperture Range: f/2.8 to f/32
  • Super UD and Fluorite Elements
  • Super Spectra and Air Sphere Coatings
  • Ring-Type Ultrasonic Motor AF System
  • Customizable Electronic Focusing Ring
  • Optical Image Stabilizer
  • Weather-Sealed Design, Fluorine Coating
  • Detachable, Rotatable Tripod Collar
  • Rounded 9-Blade Diaphragm

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Canon Explains The Advantages Of The Larger Mount On The Canon EOS R

Eos R

DCWatch posted some information about an internal Canon presentation.

The benefits and advantages of the large diameter of the RF mount featured on the Canon EOS R are discussed. The main reason is that the RF mount allows for a new and improved lens design.

Apparently, Canon had a try to use the EF M mount for their EOS R full frame mirrorless camera (machine translated text):

Initially, Canon also considered to realize a 35mm full size with the EF-M mount of the APS – C mirrorless “EOS M” series, but satisfactory results were not obtained, such as no performance aimed at . And since the system becomes large when unnecessarily increasing the mount diameter, we actually designed multiple lenses, decided to 54mm while looking at the balance of optical merit and size, the strength of the camera and so on.

This didn’t work out well, as it seems.

Canon sees these main advantages of the larger mount:

  • more flexibility on where the optical elements have to go
  • larger elements can be placed closer to the sensor
  • lenses are easier to design
  • complex lenses like the RF 50mm f/1.2L and 24-70mm f/2L are feasible
  • vignetting and other optical issues are better controlled

Note that while most of the above points would have been technically done also with the EF M mount, Canon clearly decided to go for the new mount type on the Canon EOS R because of the many advantages.

Some rumor outlets still push the rumor that Canon might release an APS-C model in the EOS R line-up; that’s not going to happen.

Canon RF 50mm f/1.2L Teardown (new optic with new technology, Lens Rentals)

Canon RF Vs EF 50mm F/1.2 EOS R System

Roger Cicala and Aaron Closz of Lens Rentals tore down the Canon RF 50mm f/1.2L, the showcase lens for the new Canon EOS R system.

It seems that for once they were a bit overwhelmed by Canon’s latest optical masterpiece. From the conclusion:

[…] the R lenses are not only entirely new optics, they are also largely new electrical and mechanical systems. There are a lot of different things in here that we haven’t seen in any Canon EF lenses. Some of them we should have expected, like the increased electronics going to the control ring. Others we don’t really understand yet, like the tension spring in the ring USM motor or the increased electrical shielding.

[…] We also saw lots of new stuff we don’t completely understand yet and a level of complexity we weren’t expecting.

[…] the RF lenses contain some new technology they [Canon, editor’s note] haven’t used before. There’s a lot of engineering that’s gone into these. Things are different inside here. As we’ll see in the next teardown we do, some of that is carrying over to at least some EF lenses. What does this mean? It means Canon has invested very heavily into developing the lenses of the R system. This level of engineering didn’t all happen in the last year, they’ve been working on this for quite a while.

You can see a few images of the teardown below, though I recommend you head over to Lens Rentals for the many pictures and the step by step description of the teardown. Just don’t do it a home yourself.

The Canon RF 50mm f/1.2L is a highly regarded lens, universally seen as one of the two lenses Canon made to showcase the possibilities of their new RF mount (the other one being the RF 28-70mm f/2L.

Canon RF 50mm f/1.2L:

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