Industry News: Samsung Announces 64MP Smartphons Sensor With 21fps

Samsung

The industry is scared by the increasing popularity of smartphones, and for a good reason. The technology evolves at a fast pace.

Now Samsung announced a new, 64MP sensor for smartphones doing 21fps. You can already get smartphones with sensors around 40MP (as the excellent Huawei P30 Pro, which seems to be gold standard for smartphone photography for the time being), and it seems the next generation of smartphones might raise the resolution to 64MP. As crazy as it sounds (at least to me) this is the future, along with computational photography algorithms getting always better. Why should people buy a dedicated camera when

Samsung press release:

Samsung Electronics, a world leader in advanced semiconductor technology, today introduced two new 0.8-micrometer (μm) pixel image sensors – the 64-megapixel (Mp) Samsung ISOCELL Bright GW1 and 48Mp ISOCELL Bright GM2. With the addition, Samsung expands its 0.8μm image sensor lineup, the smallest pixel size currently available in the market, from existing 20Mp to ultra-high 64Mp resolutions.

“Over the past few years, mobile phone cameras have become the main instrument for recording and sharing our everyday moments,” said Yongin Park, executive vice president of sensor business at Samsung Electronics. “With more pixels and advanced pixel technologies, Samsung ISOCELL Bright GW1 and GM2 will bring a new level of photography to today’s sleekest mobile devices that will enhance and help change the way we record our daily lives.”

ISOCELL Bright GW1 is a 64Mp image sensor that features the highest resolution in Samsung’s 0.8μm-pixel image sensor lineup. With pixel-merging Tetracell technology** and remosaic algorithm***, GW1 can produce bright 16Mp images in low-light environments and highly-detailed 64Mp shots in brighter settings. To take pictures resembling the way the human eye perceives its surroundings in a mixed light environment, GW1 supports real-time high dynamic range (HDR) of up to 100-decibels (dB) that provides richer hues. In comparison, the dynamic range of a conventional image sensor is at around 60dB, while that of the human eye is typically considered to be around 120dB.

GW1 is equipped with a Dual Conversion Gain (DCG) that converts the received light into an electric signal according to the illumination of the environment. This allows the sensor to optimize its full well capacity (FWC), utilizing the collected light more efficiently especially in bright environments. Sharper results can be delivered through Super PD, a high-performance phase detection auto-focus technology, and full HD recording at 480 frames-per-second (fps) is supported for smooth cinematic slow motion videos.

ISOCELL Bright GM2 is a 48Mp image sensor that also adopts Tetracell technology in low-light environments and a remosaic algorithm in well-lit settings, bringing highly-detailed pictures with natural and vivid colors. GM2, like GW1, adopts DCG as well for added performance and Super PD for fast autofocus.

Samsung ISOCELL Bright GW1 and GM2 are currently sampling and are expected to be in mass production in the second half of this year.

[via Image Sensors World]

Samsung Galaxy S7 and S7 Edge use Dual Pixel Auto-Focus technology (is this Canon’s tech?)

Samsung Galaxy S7

Samsung announced their new Samsung Galaxy S7 and S7 Edge. The interesting point: Samsung touts both smartphones to have DUal Pixel Auto-Focus (DPAF) on board. DPAF is a technology developed by Canon and introduced first on the Canon EOS 70D in 2013.

Now, while Samsung doesn’t mention Canon anywhere, there are some statements that indirectly point to Canon. Like the following sentence taken from Samsung’s Galaxy S7 product page (emphasis mine):

Dual Pixel technology, which is utilized in selective, high-end DSLR camera models, as well as those of the Galaxy S7, sends light from the lens to two image sensors separately to adjust the focus, much in the same way that the human eye does.

Did Canon license their DPAF technology to Samsung? Or did Canon build the imaging sensor found in the Galaxy S7? I couldn’t find any pertinent information on the web. However, I guess it is an almost safe bet to say that Canon is in some way involved in the imaging sensor of the Galaxy S7.

Look how Samsung presents Dual Pixel AF:

Samsung Galaxy S7

That’s pretty similar to how Canon presents DPAF.

Below are Samsung’s Galaxy S7 introduction video as well as a video about Samsung’s implementation of DPAF.