Canon EF 400mm f/2.8L IS II USM Field Review And Test

EF 400mm f/2.8L IS II USM settings. Image courtesy of Digital Photography School

This is a good and instructive review of the EF 400mm f/2.8L IS II USM ($11,500, click here) by Digital Photography School. Let me first list the specifications of the lens:

  • L-Series Optics
  • Optical Image Stabilization – 3 Modes
  • Fast Ultra-Sonic Motor (USM) Autofocus
  • Full-time Manual Focusing Functionality
  • High-speed CPU
  • Autofocus Stop Feature
  • Dust and Water Resistant
  • Fluorite Glass for Improved Quality
  • Protective Fluorine Lens Coating
  • Security Slot for Wire-Type Locks

The review comes with lots of samples (wildlife shots in Alaska). From the conclusion:

The Canon EF 400mm f/2.8L IS II USM is a treat to use but not a treat to carry around. It is best used when a base of operations can be established, like a boat or near a campsite. The sharpness from side to side is impressive but needs to be balanced with the general aspect of it being a fixed focal length lens. This is fairly easily overcome with cropping final images, especially as the pixel count on future cameras climbs.

EF EF 400mm f/2.8L IS II USM price check: Amazon USA, Amazon CA, B&H Photo, Adorama, Digitalrev, KEH Camera, eBay US, Canon USA, Canon CA, BestBuy

[via DPS]

[Review] EOS 6D First Thoughts Review (and comparison with Nikon D600)

Image credits: Digitalcamerainfo

Let’s start with a Digitalcamerinfo’s first impressions review of the EOS 6D.

The Canon EOS 6D is designed to be a lighter, cheaper alternative to the Canon EOS 5D Mark III. To that end, it accomplishes its goals, squeezing a 20.2-megapixel full-frame sensor and updated autofocus into a relatively small body. […]

The EOS 6D does, however, seem much simpler to use at first blush than either the EOS 5D Mark III or its predecessor, the venerable EOS 5D Mark II. The 6D’s inclusion of Canon’s now-ubiquitous “Q” quick control menu and a physical mode dial chock full of automatic shooting modes should make novice shooters feel right at home. The “Q” menu, in particular, makes adjusting settings much easier, taking full advantage of the large 3-inch, 1.040 million-pixel display.

Next, lets have a look at a comparison by Digitalcamerainfo between the EOS 6D and Nikon’s D600. Both cams have a price tag of $2100, have similar specs and aim at the same target (customers). Are they so much different (beside the fact that the EOS 6D has built-in GPS and WiFi)?

On the Nikon side, the D600’s top plate is pulled almost directly from their top APS-C model, the D7000; the back control scheme, on the other hand, is largely based on their recently released full-frame body, the Nikon D800. On the Canon EOS 6D you can see bits and pieces that are clearly culled from the high-end APS-C EOS 7D, while the body’s silhouette is reminiscent of a smaller Canon EOS 5D Mark III.

Won’t anticipate more, since it is a well made article you should read. So if you want to learn about the little details that differentiate one camera from the other you where to go.

Canon’s EOS 6D can be preordered at the following shops:

Click here to open the rest of the article

[Review] EF 24-70mm f/2.8L II Latest Reviews Round-Up

Lighter and smaller than the original, yet solid and sturdy, the EF 24-70mm f/2.8L II is causing lots of discussion, mainly because of the price tag of $2200. Let’s start with some first impressions by fstoppers. More detailed is the lens test performed by lensrentals.com (comparison with other similar lenses). The EF 24-70mm f/2.8L II has an outstanding sharpness and resolution:

The resolution absolutely, positively kicks butt and takes names. It is way better than the lens it replaces. It’s better at 70mm than the best Canon zoom I know of, the 70-200 f/2.8 IS II. It’s even better at 24mm than the sharpest 24mm prime we have, the Canon 24 TS-E. In the center, in the corners, it doesn’t care. We only had 5 copies to test, but they were all very similar with little copy-to-copy variation.

Another test comes from borrowlenses.com, with comparisons with other lenses and interactive test charts.

EF 24-70mm f/2.8L II specifications:

  • Large f/2.8 Aperture Through Zoom Range
  • UD Lenses Minimize Chromatic Aberrations
  • Reduced Spherical Aberrations
  • Highly Resistant to Dust and Water
  • 9-Blade Diaphragm For Beautiful Bokeh
  • Lens Coatings Minimizes Ghosting
  • Fluorine Coating Reduces Fingerprints
  • Zoom Lock Lever For Safe Transporting

EF 24-70mm f/2.8L II price check: Amazon USA, Amazon CA, B&H Photo, Adorama, Digitalrev, KEH Camera, eBay US, Canon USA, Canon CA, BestBuy EF 24-70mm f/2.8 price check: Amazon USA, Amazon CA, B&H Photo, Adorama, Digitalrev, KEH Camera, eBay US, Canon USA, Canon CA, BestBuy

[Review] Latest EOS 6D Reviews And Hands-on Round-Up (7D comparison and interview with Canon exec about 6D)

First week of EOS 6D is behind us. We aforesaid it (though we were wrong on the name), Canon made it. Now let’s see how the community is dealing with Canon’s new, entry level full frame DSLR, of which Canon says it is the smallest and lightest full-frame DSLR to date. The EOS 6D is clearly countering Nikon’s D600 ($2100). The EOS 6D is also Canon’s first EOS DSLR with built-in WiFi and GPS. This means you can change your camera settings, geotag photos and transfer your shots to your smartphone (or ipad, Android tablet etc) using Canon’s free iOS and Android apps. The 6D costs $2100 and can be per-ordered at the following shops (click on shop name):

Btw, I think the EF 17-40mm f/4L USM (around $700, click here) is the perfect lens for this full frame camera, and, with a price of around $700, it is one of the more affordable L lenses in Canon’s line-up.

Cameralabs published a preview and an interview with the European Product Manager, Richard Shepherd (video above). Another preview comes from The Onlinephotographer. If you guess which camera among the EOS 6D and the EOS 7D is the right one for you, then you should have a look at Digitalcameraworld, since they are tackling this very question. Read the article, since it is comparing both cams on a detailed basis. However, here is a short sum-up:

Reasons to buy the Canon 6D

  • Its much larger sensor (more than 2.5x larger than the 7D), and all the creative possibilities it affords
  • Higher sensitivity and better low-light performance
  • Wi-Fi capability
  • GPS functionality
  • HDR function
  • Smaller and lighter

Reasons to buy the Canon 7D

  • Faster continuous shooting rate
  • More cross-type focus points (19 vs 11)
  • More viewfinder coverage (100% vs 97%)
  • Faster maximum shutter speed (1/8000sec vs 1/4000sec)
  • Much cheaper

Next hands-on preview comes from ephotozine, lots of pics of the camera itself. Finally, there is Petapixel’s Michael Zhang who had his hands on the EOS 6D and is sharing its thoughts.

I have also an interview with Mike Owen, Professional Image Marketing Manager for Canon Europe Ltd, made by Imaging Resource founder and publisher Dave Etchells. The interview is rather long and mainly about the EOS 6D (but not only). Regarding the sensor resolution:

We very much feel that that resolution, 20 to 22 megapixels on a full frame sensor is the real sweet spot. It’s the maximum that we can get to without starting to see a conflict between noise performance and resolution. And obviously, what we want to try to do is give you the best possible balance. And over the last few years, what you’ve seen is that other manufacturers have been sort of creeping up with their resolution. But we’ve reached a sort of sweet spot since 5 years ago when we launched the 1DS Mark III. And we think that, at the moment, that is the better place to be in terms of performance, allowing people to have the high ISO capabilities–high as you’re able to get with the current Canon range as well as the high resolution and image quality.

About the auto-focus system and the reasons for having just one cross type sensor:

I mean, yes, there is the cost side of things, but what we’ve tried to do with the autofocus system on the 6D is to actually improve low-light performance. It goes down to EV -3. So when emphasizing low-light performance, we’ve always had to make elements of the AF system larger, which limits our ability to put in more cross-type points.

Finally, below you find a video hands-on review by DigitalCameraWorld.

EOS 6D price check: Amazon USA, Amazon CA, B&H Photo, Adorama, Digitalrev, KEH Camera, eBay US, Canon USA, Canon CA, BestBuy EF 17-40mm f/4L USM price check: Amazon USA, Amazon CA, B&H Photo, Adorama, Digitalrev, KEH Camera, eBay US, Canon USA, Canon CA, BestBuy

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[Review] First Review Of The EF 24-70mm f/2.8L II USM (Lens Is Shipping Now)

The very first EF 24-70mm f/2.8 II USM review comes from ThatNikonGuy. He compares the new 24-70 with the old one. Enjoy! Both B&H (click here) and Adorama (click here) started to ship Canons new EF 24-70mm f/2.8L II USM!

  • Large f/2.8 Aperture Through Zoom Range
  • UD Lenses Minimize Chromatic Aberrations
  • Reduced Spherical Aberrations
  • Highly Resistant to Dust and Water
  • 9-Blade Diaphragm For Beautiful Bokeh
  • Lens Coatings Minimizes Ghosting
  • Fluorine Coating Reduces Fingerprints
  • Zoom Lock Lever For Safe Transporting