EOS 5D3 vs EOS C300 vs RED Scarlet at low light

How do the EOS 5D Mark III ($3,499), the EOS C300 ($15,999) and RED’s Scarlet (the pixel champion! <$10,000) compare one to the others? Good question, and over at nofilmschool they tried to answer the question. And what would be better than a bike race shot at night? Spoiler: The C300 beats them all, much better performance at low light (not really a surprise). However, given the big price difference, the EOS 5D Mark III performance is worth of consideration. Quoting:

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Speedlite 600EX-RT Mini Review by S. Bourne

Scott Bourne posted a mini review about Canon’s flagship Speedlite, the 600EX-RT. Synthetic and concise, the review discusses its features, also compared to previous versions of Canon’s Speedlites. Quoting:

The main thing I like about this flash (other than its amazing power) is it’s ability to zoom from 20-200mm with a Canon lens and to do so automatically. This is quite an improvement over the 580EXII and if I were to buy the 600, that’s the main reason I would do so. The built-in radio control is also a big deal since it eliminates the need to buy third-party flash triggers.

Btw, the 600 EX-RT is suitable for Canon Instant Double Rebates if bought together with a 5D Mark III, 5D Mark II, EOS 60D or EOS 7D. The Instant Double Rebates apply to the mentioned camera bodies and selected lenses and/or Speedlites. Savings can go up to $250, depending by the kit you choose. The rebates last until June 2.

EOS 5D Mark III, news and reviews round-up (vs D800, and free LR presets)

Credits: Mike Kobal

Ok, let us start with some EOS 5D Mark III vs Nikon D800 stuff. Photographer Mike Kobal got both cams in his hands and shares his impressions. Optical Viewfinder: slightly brighter on the 5D Mark III; mirror/shutter: a bit louder on the D800 (click here for audio file 5d3 vs d800 in continuous shooting mode, click here for silent mode); Auto-Focus: 5D3 little bit faster, nails AF almost immediately; sensor aspect ratio: D800 has crop modes and aspect ratio can be set, useful when you have to shot in aspect ratios different from 2:3. Mike’s conclusion: The D800 will appeal to the Studio/commercial photographer with the occasional photo-journalistic assignment, the 5D3 will appeal to the location oriented commercial photographer, the photo journalist and the wedding photographer. More after the jump.

 

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Powershot G1 X DxO-Mark Scores and Lens Test

DxO Labs just published the measures for Canon’s Powershot G1 X, and the little cam scores good, very good. DxO Labs’ interpretation of the scores:

  • You have a reflex-quality sensor in camera of the same volume as a G11.
  • You can use this camera even under relatively difficult conditions.
  • If you’re an amateur photographer, this camera can satisfy pretty much all of your needs (especially if you want to take great family photos, for example). If you’re a professional photographer, this can be a good backup camera.

Compared to other, similar cameras, the G1 X outperforms almost all of them (overall score is higher in any case) or has a score that can hold up with Canon entry level DSLR’s. Read more after the break.

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Hacked EOS 5D Mark III: More footage

More footage shot with a modified EOS 5D Mark III has been published. I reported about this hack made by James Miller (here, here and here). The mod consists in removing the OLPF (Optical Low-Pass Filter) from the sensor of the 5D Mark III. The result: an increase in resolution. The surprising thing is that neither moire nor aliasing become a real problem without the OLPF (aka Anti-Aliasing filter). Without the OLPF filter the sensor becomes also more sensitive to IR light, making the 5D Mark III suitable for astrophotography. To fully enjoy (and analyze) the footage it’s better to login to Vimeo and to download the uncompressed version of the video.

[via EOSHD]

Scott Bourne and the 5D Mark III

This is the most hilarious review about Nikon’s D800 I’ve ever read. Scott Bourne reviews it, and while doing the review he praises the EOS 5D Mark III. Funny. Needless to say: he also considers the AF of the 5D Mark III superior to the AF featured on the D800. The lower price tag is also demystified, since having a 36MP sensor means having bigger files, and that means you eventually have to invest in new computer equipment: […] you better also plan on buying more and larger hard drives, a faster computer and more and larger memory cards. The files coming off the camera are at least 40 megabytes. Do the math! […] that means you’ll need three times the hard drive space and three times the camera memory. Add that to the cost of the camera and it’s not quite the bargain it appears to be compared with the 5D MK III. Also – get used to going for coffee while your images import.

About the Auto-Focus: The Nikon D800 also has a few small problems. Its autofocus doesn’t work as expected. It seems to do an initial grab and then fine tune. The AF on the D800 is in my opinion, inferior to the AF on the 5DMKIII.

[via photofocus]