EOS 5D Mark III Sunday News Round-up

Time to report some 5D Mark III news.

Let’s start with a problem some users have with Canon’s DPP software. People reports that DPP is generating extremely soft jpgs from the 5d Mark III RAW files. Two possible solution for the problem:

  1. go to DPP’s “preferences”, then “general setting” tab, and the change “viewing and saving RAW images” to “high speed” (default is “high quality”). When using “high speed” the noise reduction palette is not used no moiré correction is applied.
  2. use a third party RAW converter, namely: Adobe Camera Raw 6.7rc. Using ACR you first generate DNGs and the can use this DNG wherever you want (remember that LightRoom 4 does not natively support the 5D Mark III)

Ok, that should help to see all the super sharpness of the  5d Mark III images.

Next, let us talk about reviews. There is a bunch out there that are helpful and worth to be read if you want to learn more about the  5d Mark III, or need to take a decision if to buy it or not.

Le me start with a detailed hands-on review by lightingmods. Read part 1 and don’t miss part 2 of this review. The latter comes with useful samples, and other informations you may be interested in.

Engadget has a pre-production 5D3 for two weeks (those lucky guys…) and made a serious field test with the cam.

They start the review:

Shoot in the dark. That’s essentially what you can do with the Canon 5D Mark III — with a top sensitivity of ISO 102,400, what was once unfathomable could soon become an acceptable standard. While point-and-shoot manufacturers are adding WiFi and GPS, and tweaking algorithms in an effort to boost sensitivity beyond the 6400 mark, Canon and Nikon are making clear cases for a DSLR upgrade, by drastically improving image quality. The 5D Mark II had an excellent three-year run, but with its 22.3-megapixel sensor, 1.04M-dot 3.2-inch LCD, improved autofocus and high-performance video capabilities, Canon’s latest full-frame DSLR is an entirely different beast, and a very compelling successor.

Sounds good to me. But let us see the single points they are discussing:

  • Silent shooting – You made it past the break! As a gesture of our appreciation, we’re going to let you in on a little Mark III secret — in fact, if that high-ISO shooting wasn’t in the picture, this could very well have been our favorite new feature.
  • ISO 25,600 and beyond – Yes, you know the Mark III can capture usable images at ISO 25,600 — the top sensitivity available on the 5D Mark II — but there’s a noticeable improvement with this year’s model, even with our pre-production sample
  • Image quality – As you’ve probably already gathered, we’re very impressed with the Mark III’s performance, both while capturing images and when it came time to review them after a shoot. So much so, that we wouldn’t hesitate to declare that image quality is absolutely spectacular.
  • Focusing – You can’t really prioritize features when it comes to a professional camera — everything needs to work, very well, and focusing performance is right up there with image quality in our book. When every shot counts, having a flawless focusing system is key, and thanks to the 61-point High Density Reticular Autofocus on board (the same system you’ll find on the 1D X), we felt quite fulfilled in this department as well.
  • Video – Like its predecessor, the 5D Mark III is an incredibly capable video shooter
  • Battery life – Battery life shouldn’t be an issue on any recent DSLR. Period. This is also the case with the 5D Mark III — you’re likely to fill your memory card long before you exhaust the battery
And finally they conclude:
We honestly haven’t been this in love with a camera since we reviewed the Sony NEX-7. And while there’s little to compare from a price and design perspective, we’re seriously questioning that affair, and completely ready to sacrifice the compact design in favor of this incredibly capable do-everything shooter. At $3,499 for the body only, Canon priced this latest 5D higher than its predecessor, which rang in at $2,699 at launch. Still, if you’ve been considering a 5d Mark III purchase, don’t hesitate — it’s worth the investment, we promise. And if you’ve already placed your order or have one in the mail, get ready to have your world turned upside-down — this thing is simply amazing, in every way.
The review (click here) is filled with sample pics (lots shot in low light) that can also be downloaded (original files). Two videos are provided. The first one a sample video shot with the 5d Mark III.

The other one compares the design of the 5d Mark III and 5D Mark II

The photographyblog has a LOT of sample images to show, also samples that cover the whole ISO range. They also provided a sample video shot at the highest quality setting of 1920×1080 and at 25 frames per second. You can see the movie clicking here.

Samples, samples, samples, who doesn’t want to see as much of possible of them? :-) We do. DPreview gives us the gift of a selection of real world samples images. They also updated the 5D Mark III preview page with new information about the cam. More samples taken with a final production Canon EOS 5D Mark III using a selection of lenses can be seen at cameralabs. The whole set (original size!) can be seen and downloaded from their Flickr page. More pixel-peeping exercises can be performed using the samples at dsrl4real. Or, for the lazy ones among us, by watching the following video:

5 mins with the 5d3 from Sam Morgan Moore on Vimeo.

If you are still stuck in comparison chaos then the following links should be useful for you:

National Geographic Photographer Ira Block got a 5d Mark III and shares his thoughts about Canon’s new FF cam (samples included).  Next, it’s photographer Philip Bloom who shares thoughts and pictures of his first 48 hours with a 5d Mark III with us. This are pics shot by a professional photographer, some are simply beautiful.

Ok, that’s all for today. Hope it makes a pleasant sunday reading for all of you. To see the latest 5d Mark III pictures uploaded to Flickr click here. For more information, including order and pre-order options click here. EOS 5D Mark III price check: B&H Photo, Adorama, Amazon USA, Amazon Canada, Canon Canada, Canon USA

And since we are all eager to find good deals, have a look at our eBay live-ticker for possible 5D Mark II deals:

World-wide EOS 5D Mark III price check:[shoplist 2431] [via DP, engadget, NC] [shariff]

#EOS5DMarkIII unboxing video

For all of us who are eager to see the new 5D Mark III (and possibly to get it in our hands :-) ), there is an unboxing video to look at (thanks to our reader Eddy).

 

But, hey, there is another one I found (this time in English).

To see all my EOS 5D Mark III coverage click here. To see more reviews, sample pictures and world-wide order option click here.

Let me know what you think about Canon’s new full-frame camera.

 

Zeiss Distagon T* 2,8/15 officially announced & first review

So now it is official. The much awaited Distagon T* 2,8/15 super wide angle lens has been officially announced by Zeiss (product flyer here). Adorama is the first shop I found that is accepting pre-orders (click here). Technical specifications:

Focal length 15 mm
Aperture range f/2.8 – f/22
Focusing range 0.25 m – infinity
Number of elements/groups 15/12
Angular field, diag./horiz./vert. 110° / 100° / 76°
Coverage at close range 340 x 221 mm
Filter thread M95 x 1.0
Dimensions (with caps) ø 103 mm, length 132-135 mm
Weight 730g-820g
Camera mounts F Mount (ZF.2)
EF Mount (ZE)

In Zeiss’ own words:

Infinitely Wide

Infinitely wide horizons, cramped interiors or small objects in large surroundings – with the Distagon T* 2.8/15, all photographers can deliberately orchestrate extreme perspectives. With a field angle of 110°, the super  wide angle is the ideal companion when it comes to capturing events in a way that makes them dynamic and extraordinary. Whether salt crystals or drops of water – its integrated lens shade and standard filter thread afford the front lens optimal protection from wind and weather.

The technically impressive features of the Distagon T* 2,8/15 include extraordinary chromatic aberration correction and the prevention of color fringes caused by chromatic aberration almost without exception. Two aspheric lenses, special types of glass with exceptional partial dispersion and the floating elements design, guarantee high image quality from close-up to infinity. The Carl Zeiss T* anti-reflective coating and the advanced treatment of the lens edges with special dark black lacquers ensure insensitivity to reflections and stray light.

And there is already a first review of a production model by our friend Chris Gampat over at thephoblographer.

It’s a huge and massive lens (820g), with a solid lens hood made of metal (as well as the lens cap). Chris is enthusiastic about features and perfomance. Distortion is well controlled and color rendition is exceptionally good. Chris’ conclusion:

At the time of my writing this conclusion, I have spent quite a while with the lens. I’ve had a ton of fun with it. With that said though, I’m going to fire off a couple of quick remarks. First off, I would personally never shoot this wide. This lens is meant for architecture, landscapes, events and scenic shooting. If you’re out there making money from your landscapes and architecture, then I want to tell you to go search around the internet for pre-orders (ships in May), get your credit card in hand, and purchase this lens for $2,948.00. The build quality and image quality is spectacular. The fact that Zeiss was able to create such a lens with little vignetting, distortion, and yet maintain such remarkable sharpness is very praise-worthy in my eyes and on my calibrated screen.

Like most Zeiss lenses, the color rendition is best when shot wide open. Thankfully the lens also has an AF confirmation chip; which makes it a true beaut.

My only major complaint is there this lens lacks the bucketloads of micro-contrast that the other Zeiss lenses have that therefore make the subject in focus pop out of the image with a nearly 3D-like effect.

Otherwise, it is a very large lens; but it has to be due to the design.

In the end, I can only give this lens my highest recommendations to landscape and architecture photographers.

But for me: who shoots portraits and events; the company has other options that are more attractive.

They made also a sample video using the Distagon T* 2,8/15:

The review is truly worth to be read, and comes with lots of sample pics and a set of samples that cover the aperture range of the lens.

Finally, Zeiss’ press release:

 

Carl Zeiss brings out a new super wide angle lens in May 2012. The super wide angle Distagon T* 2,8/15 will be available with an EF (ZE) or F bayonet (ZF.2). With an extra-large angle of view of 110 degrees in combination with a fast f/2.8 aperture, the lens enables the features for dramatic perspectives and performance demanded by the most ambitious landscape and architectural photographers. With a unique ability to capture events in a natural and extraordinary manner, it is also an ideal companion for advertising, journalism and commercial photography. 

Thanks to the extreme angle of view of the lens, the fore- and background can be creatively emphasized in landscape and architecture photography. These applications will also benefit from the large depth-of-field, which provides a wide range of image sharpness from close-up up to infinity. With a close focus of 0.25m (10”) – combined with a wide angle view – photographers can work in tight spaces, while also allowing focus on close-up details. Distortion is extremely well controlled, producing naturally proportioned photographs which are not typical of many other super wide angle lenses. “With the Distagon T* 2,8/15, Carl Zeiss sets the standard in super wide angle photography,” says Dr. Michael Pollmann, Consumer Lenses Program Manager in the Camera Lens Division of Carl Zeiss AG. “Even at full aperture it achieves outstanding detail rendition and opens up room for extremely imaginative design.”

The Distagon T* 2,8/15 incorporates two aspheric lenses and special types of glass material with abnormal partial dispersion to provide an extraordinary correction of chromatic aberration. A floating elements design guarantees high image quality from close-focus through infinity. Like the other SLR lenses in the ZE and ZF.2 series, stray light and reflections are well controlled by the Carl Zeiss T* anti-reflective coating and the sophisticated treatment of the lens element edges with special light absorbing paint. 

The robust all-metal barrel of the Distagon T* 2,8/15 is designed for decades of reliable service. A long focus rotation and buttery-smooth action is perfect for photographers who want to take control of their picture making, as well as for filmmakers looking for superior focus control. A nine blade aperture provides a nearly circular opening, producing natural looking out of focus details.

The lens shade is integrated into the design and helps to protect the lens surface from unintentional damage. The 95mm filter thread accepts all standard filters, including the recently released Carl Zeiss T* UV and POL filters. 

The lens will begin shipping in May 2012 at a recommended retail price of €2,148 or US$2,948 (excluding VAT)*.

More 5D Mark III sample pictures

Hold on all you pixel-peepers out there (myself included). I found some useful (at least I think) samples shot with Canon’s EOS 5D Mark III. The interesting thing: these are all nightshots, and they are also crops. Different ISO settings are covered. You can see and analyze the pictures here.

For more important information about the EOS 5D Mark III (and world-wide order and pre-order options) click here.

To see all of my EOS 5D Mark III coverage click here.

Canon EOS 1D X ready for pre-order

Right now B&H told me that they have the Canon EOS 1D X ready for pre-order (click here). Price is $6,799 and it will start shipping by the end of April.

EDIT: Adorama is also accepting pre-orders for the 1D X (click here)

CPN (Canon Professional Network) has a good article about Frits van Eldik shooting an F1 event with a EOS 1D X. Have a look here to read about the technical specifications of Canon’s next flagship, or read this to get more insight. Canon’s 1D X page is still a work in progress (no manual for download yet), but for sure worth to have a look.

The guys over at techradar (video above) have a hands-on review with lots of details (click here to read). Another hands-on os provided by imaging-resource. And, hey!, even Wikipedia has an entry for the 1D X :-).

New EOS 5D Mark III promo video and rental information

The video comes from Canon France and it’s called Eye of the mind. It was made to show the color capturing capabilities of the EOS 5D Mark III.

Then: lensrentals.com is accepting reservations for the 5D Mark III (click here). If you can’t afford one, at least you can rent one. :-)

One last thing: March 22 has been confirmed to be the first shipping date.

For more important information about the EOS 5D Mark III (and world-wide order and pre-order options) click here.

To see all of my EOS 5D Mark III coverage click here.

EOS 5D Mark III price check: B&H Photo, Adorama, Amazon USA, Amazon Canada, Canon Canada, Canon USA