[Review] EF 24mm f/2.8 IS USM and EF 28mm f/2.8 IS USM (and why it is better to have newer lenses for new gear)

ephotozine reviewed Canon’s new EF 24mm f/2.8 IS USM ($850, click here) and EF 28mm f/2.8 IS USM ($800, click here). Both lenses are the second iteration, adding Image Stabilization and USM to its features. They replace some rather old, and affordable, lenses, the EF 24mm f/2.8 ($374, click here) and the EF 28mm f/2.8 ($259, click here). These lenses are somewhat discussed. They have good performance but it is common opinion that the price tag is a little exaggerated. However, all reviews I saw are crediting these lenses having good optical properties and overall performance. These lenses are particularly useful for videographers. ephotozine wanted to have a closer look on both lenses.

Canon EF 24mm f/2.8 IS USM Pros (click here for the review)

  • Good build quality
    Lightweight
    Image Stabilisation
    Excellent sharpness
    Focuses close

Canon EF 28mm f/2.8 IS USM Pros (click here for the review)

  • Good build quality
    Lightweight
    Image Stabilisation
    Outstanding sharpness
    Focuses close

Finally, I want to feature a post by Scott Bourne about how important new glasses are for new DSLRs. The article takes AF performance as an example: if you are not using pro glasses on pro gear you can’t expect that your DSLR will perform as expected. And there is more (emphasis mine):

I spoke with Canon representatives who prefer to remain unnamed and they admitted that the new AF systems on the 5D Mk IIIand 1DX are optimized to work with the newest, fastest glass.

So the thing to know is this. If you expect a remarkable improvement in AF just because you buy a new 5D MK III or 1DX you may be slightly disappointed. You need that fast, new glass too.

Simple, isn’t it? :-) Good that there is a huge Canon lenses August discount program going on (click here)!

EF 24mm f/2.8 IS USM price check: B&H Photo, Adorama, Amazon USA, Amazon CA, KEH Camera, BestBuy, Canon CA, Canon USA EF 28mm f/2.8 IS USM price check: B&H Photo, Adorama, Amazon USA, Amazon CA, KEH Camera, BestBuy, Canon CA, Canon USA

[Review] EOS 1D-X Detailed Review And Insights

Techradar got a full-production sample of the EOS-1D X and have run it through their labs. The hands-on review they made includes resolution charts, dynamic range and signal to noise ratio. They’ve compared the 1D-X with the Nikon D4, but also the EOS 5D Mark III, the EOS-1D Mark IV and the Nikon D800.

Sample images are provided too. Btw, I heard from various sources that the major shops are starting to stock EOS 1D-Xs.

EOS 1D-X price check and availability: B&H Photo, Adorama, Amazon USA, Amazon CA, KEH Camera, BestBuy, Canon CA, Canon USA. The following seller should have the 1D-X for $6,799.00 (click on the shop name): Adorama (click here)B&H (click here)Amazon US (click here) and DigitalRev (click here).

Signal to Noise ratio (RAW converted to TIFF)
Dynamic Range (RAW converted to TIFF)
[via techradar]

[Review] Rebel T4i/650D With 18-135mm IS STM Reviewed And Compared

Cameralabs published a detailed review of the Rebel T4i/650D with the EF-S 18-135mm IS STM lens. One of the highlight of the T4i/650D is the Auto-Focus system (emphasis mine):

The hybrid CMOS AF sensor combined with improvements to the stand alone phase detect AF provides the T4i / 650D with one of the most sophisticated focusing systems of any Canon DSLR, particularly for continuous autofocus during movie recording. Coupled with one of the new quiet STM lenses its movie autofocusing is on a par with that offerred by touch-screen mirrorless compact system cameras.

It’s the same AF that is featured on the recently announced EOS M. We wrote before about how much the Rebel T4i/650D was a testbed for the technologies later employed on the EOS M. Camerlabs compares the T4i/650D to Nikon’s D3200. The Rebel T4i/650D gets a “highly recommended” final score. From the verdict:

With the Rebel T4i / EOS 650D Canon has neatly addressed […] issues. The Hybrid CMOS AF sensor improves AF capability in Live view but, more importantly, makes this the first Canon DSLR to provide truly effective continuous AF during movie recording, putting it on a par with Sony’s SLT models and touch-screen mirrorless CSC’s like the Olympus PEN E-P3 and Panasonic Lumix GX1.

Its 3 inch touch-screen […] is intended to pull in compact upgraders and will succeed, but even those who love to use physical controls will find it enhances the handling characteristics in a very positive fashion. Other enhancements, like built-in stereo microphones, 5fps continuous shooting, the Multi shot noise reduction stacking mode and built-in correction for chromatic aberration make the Rebel T4i / EOS 650D an excellent all-round performer and a hard act to beat for first time buyers with a little extra in the budget or those looking to move up to the next level. I highly recommend it.

[via Cameralabs]

Canon EOS 1D X And Multiple Exposures – An Olympic Showcase

Multiple Exposures means the ability to take a number of pictures all on the same frame.This functionality was tested at the London Olympics by Reuters photographer Mike Blake. His experience can be read on the Reuters Blog (with lots of images). What multiple exposure can do for you is best summarized in the following statement: “capture and combine sequences of images conveying the action and movement of disciplines such as gymnastics“. This is feasible since the 1D X can produce composite images combining multiple shots (the individual shots are also saved)

Image Credits: Reuters

For the time being the EOS 1D-X can be pre-ordered for $6,799.00 at Adorama (click here)B&H (click here)Amazon US (click here) and DigitalRev (click here). Canon 1D-X features:

  • Newly designed 18.1 Megapixel full-frame CMOS sensor, 14-bit A/D conversion, wide range ISO setting 100-51,200 (L:50, H1: 102400, H2: 204800) for shooting from bright to dim light and next generation Dual DIGIC 5+ Image Processors for enhanced noise reduction and blazing processing speed
  • New 61-Point High Density Reticular AF including 41 cross-type AF points with f/4.0 lens support including 5 dual diagonal AF points (sensitive to f/2.8), plus EOS iTR (Intelligent Tracking and Recognition) AF for accurate subject tracking
  • EOS iSA (Intelligent Subject Analysis) powered by Canon’s DIGIC 4 Image Processor, featuring a 100,000-pixel RGB Metering Sensor with subject and color recognition for reliable AE
  • EOS HD Video with manual exposure control and multiple frame rates (1080: 30p (29.97) /24p (23.976) / 25p, 720: 60p (59.94) / 50p, 480: 60p (59.94) / 50p) with 4GB automatic file partitioning (continuous recording time 29 minutes 59 seconds) with selectable “All i-frame” or IPB compression
  • Outstanding shooting performance: up to 12.0 fps continuous shooting (14.0 fps in Super High Speed Mode) using a UDMA CF card
  • Magnesium alloy body with shutter durability tested up to 400,000 cycles, exclusive dust-and-weather resistance and new Ultrasonic Wave Motion Cleaning (UWMC) for improved vibration-based dust removal
  • Intelligent Viewfinder with superimposed LCD display, approximately 100% field of view, wide viewing angle of 35 degrees and 0.76x magnification
  • 3.2-inch Clear View II LCD monitor, 170 degree viewing angle, 1,040,000-dot VGA, reflection resistance with multi coating and high-transparency materials for bright and clear viewing
  • Improved handling with the addition of new customizable controls and enhanced recording options with Dual Card Slots, Gigabit-Ethernet terminal and compatibility with optional Canon Wireless File Transmitter and GPS Receiver
[DPreview via Reuters]

[Review] EOS 1D-X By Andy Rouse

Well known wildlife photographer Andy Rouse is among the first (and selected few) to have had an EOS-1D X in his hands. This is more a kind of field-test, less a lab-setting based investigation of camera performance. Auto-focus is tested and described in a comprehensive way. Face detection is also put under stress, with an owl. While I suggest you have a look at the review on your own, i quote some excerpts from the conclusion:

The AF system I found to be astoundingly accurate […] it could lock onto anything […]. The images I have shown here are all razor sharp, again I was surprised to see so many in a sequence with such fast action. I’m quite happy to say that after my limited testing I can see that the AF system is probably the best I have ever used. Yes it is quite complex, but […] for 99% of you they will be fine.

[…] noise performance. I have never seen a Canon file like it, at the kind of ISO’s I like to shoot at, the image quality is great, detail is intense and the noise is not an issue.

For the time being the EOS-1D X can be pre-ordered for $6,799.00 at Adorama (click here)B&H (click here)Amazon US (click here) and DigitalRev (click here).

[via landscapephotographymagazine]

[Review] EOS M vs. Rebel T4i/650D, Panasonic GX1, Nikon 1 V1/1 J1

Techradar posted some comparisons/buying guides for you to check. Keep in mind that for the time being there are only pre-production models of the EOS M, so a professional made comparison with other gear is yet not feasible. The EOS M (click here to see all specs) is compared to the Rebel T4i/650D (which has the same sensor as the EOS M), the Panasonic GX1 and to Nikon’s 1 V1 and 1 J1.

Price check of cited cameras:

EOS M: B&H Photo, Adorama, Amazon USA, Amazon CA, KEH Camera, BestBuy, Canon CA, Canon USA Panasonic GX1: B&H Photo, Adorama, Amazon USA, Amazon CA, KEH Camera, BestBuy, Canon CA, Canon USA Nikon 1 V1: B&H Photo, Adorama, Amazon USA, Amazon CA, KEH Camera, BestBuy, Canon CA, Canon USA Nikon 1 J1: B&H Photo, Adorama, Amazon USA, Amazon CA, KEH Camera, BestBuy, Canon CA, Canon USA