How to Protect Your Camera in Cold Weather (Canon infographic)

Protect Your Camera

Going out to take pictures in cold weather? You better protect your gear. The infographic below tells you how to protect your camera

Before You Head Out 

1. Never leave the house without wearing a pair of waterproof and insulated boots to keep your feet warm and dry, even after standing for long hours. 

2. Go out with fresh batteries and carry spare ones in your pockets. This ensures you’ll be able to quickly switch to fresh, warm batteries and continue shooting. Also consider using an additional battery grip for longer lasting power.  

3. Bring along a carbon fibre tripod as it handles the cold better and helps to lighten your equipment load. If you’re using an aluminum tripod, wear your gloves when touching it. Find out the basic equipment you’ll need to bring with 10 Things to Pack for a Photoshoot

Here is the infographic about how to protect your camera:

protect your camera

Cold Weather Shooting Tips 

1. Clean and crisp winter air means sharper photos. With the sun lower in the sky, quality of light is better for more hours of the day. The shadows formed are also longer, which adds more interest to landscape shots.  

2. Snow can be tricky to shoot. Tip: Expose for the brightest portions of the scene and ensure your highlights don’t get blown to all white. Using a lens hood also keeps light from bouncing around.  

3. Use a circular polarising filter (CPL) to clear up any haze in your photos, and reduce glare on snow and ice.  

4. Limit your usage of the LCD screen to cut down on chimping, or checking every photo immediately after clicking the shutter button. Instead, use your camera’s viewfinder to help conserve battery life. 

5. Achieve a minimalist look in your images by keeping an eye out for details, such as a ski cabin that stands out on the mountainside, as the landscape becomes a blank canvas for you to get creative with.  

[via The Phoblographer]

Canon EOS R Quick Tips Videos

Canon Eos R Firmware

Canon EOS R at a glance:

  • 30.3MP Full-Frame CMOS Sensor
  • DIGIC 8 Image Processor
  • UHD 4K30 Video; C-Log & 10-Bit HDMI Out
  • Dual Pixel CMOS AF, 5655 AF Points
  • 3.69m-Dot OLED Electronic Viewfinder
  • 3.15″ 2.1m-Dot Swivel Touchscreen LCD
  • Expanded ISO 50-102400, 8 fps Shooting
  • Wi-Fi and Bluetooth, SD UHS-II Card Slot
  • Multi-Function Bar, Dual Pixel RAW

Canon USA posted a series of Canon EOS R quick tips videos. A huge set of videos.

All Canon EOS R quick tips videos are listed here.

Canon EOS R world-wide order links:

Asia & Australia: AliExpress, Amazon JAPAN, Amazon CHINA, Amazon INDIA, Amazon AU, Amazon USA, Digitalrev, Adorama, B&H Photo, eBay Australia, Rakuten JP
Europe & UK: Amazon DE, Amazon UK, Amazon FR, Amazon IT, DigitalRev, eBay DE, Wex Photo Video, Park Cameras, Canon DE, Canon UK, Canon IT, Canon FR
USA/Canada: Amazon USA, Amazon CA, B&H Photo, Adorama, Digitalrev, KEH Camera, eBay US, Canon USA, Canon CA, BestBuy

Canon RF mount lenses world-wide order links:

Asia & Australia: AliExpress, Amazon JAPAN, Amazon CHINA, Amazon INDIA, Amazon AU, Amazon USA, Digitalrev, Adorama, B&H Photo, eBay Australia, Rakuten JP
Europe & UK: Amazon DE, Amazon UK, Amazon FR, Amazon IT, DigitalRev, eBay DE, Wex Photo Video, Park Cameras, Canon DE, Canon UK, Canon IT, Canon FR
USA/Canada: Amazon USA, Amazon CA, B&H Photo, Adorama, Digitalrev, KEH Camera, eBay US, Canon USA, Canon CA, BestBuy

Canon EOS 6D Mark II video tutorial and user guide

Canon Eos 6d Mark Ii Deal

Canon EOS 6D Mark II: Amazon USA, Amazon CA, B&H Photo, Adorama, Digitalrev, KEH Camera, eBay US, Canon USA, Canon CA, BestBuy

EOS 6D Mark II at a glance:

  • 26.2MP Full-Frame CMOS Sensor
  • DIGIC 7 Image Processor
  • 45-Point All-Cross Type AF System
  • Full HD Video at 60 fps; Electronic IS
  • 3.0″ Vari-Angle Touchscreen LCD
  • Dual Pixel CMOS AF and Movie Servo AF
  • Native ISO 40000, Expanded to ISO 102400
  • 6.5 fps Shooting; Time-Lapse & HDR Movie
  • Built-In GPS, Bluetooth, & Wi-Fi w/ NFC
  • Dust and Water Resistant; SD Card Slot

1 hour and 20 minutes of video tutorial and user guide for the new Canon EOS 6D Mark II by Tony & Chelsea Northrup. This video should definitely cover anything you might want to know about the EOS 6D Mark II.

Table of contents:

0:00:49 Battery
0:02:23 USB Battery Charger
0:02:58 Lens
0:03:41 Ports
0:04:25 SD Cards
0:06:12 SD Card Readers
0:07:06 Lightroom Mobile
0:07:27 Green Auto vs Program
0:07:58 Taking a Picture (Live View)
0:09:47 LCD Brightness
0:10:29 Taking a Picture (Viewfinder)
0:12:29 Q Button
0:13:11 Diopter
0:14:26 Taking Video
0:15:21 Digital Image Stabilization
0:17:42 Microphones
0:18:25 Video Timelapses
0:21:06 Raw Timelapses
0:22:50 Trigger
0:23:57 GPS
0:26:48 Bracketing for Dynamic Range
0:30:55 PhotoMerge in Lightroom
0:31:06 Reviewing a Picture
0:34:03 Q Button (Rating)
0:34:44 Aperture Priority and F-Stops
0:37:23 DoF Preview
0:39:04 Practice
0:39:51 Shutter Priority
0:41:48 Practice
0:42:37 Manual Mode
0:43:50 Practice
0:44:03 Bulb Mode
0:45:41 Stunning Digital Photography
0:47:00 Shutter Modes
0:50:21 Focusing Modes
0:52:00 Focus Points
0:53:17 Tuning Focus
0:54:00 Manual Focus
0:54:55 Metering Modes
0:55:34 Changing ISO
0:56:45 Allowing Extended ISO
0:57:45 Exposure Compensation
1:00:18 Lock Switch
1:00:40 Custom Settings 1 and 2
1:02:23 White Balance
1:03:08 Mirror Lockup
1:03:39 Formatting a Memory Card
1:04:32 WiFi
1:10:12 Recommended Settings
1:10:16 Disable the BEEP
1:10:44 Raw vs JPG
1:11:23 Back-button Focus
1:13:49 My Menu
1:15:09 Copyright Info
1:16:15 Software Suggestions
1:16:53 Lens SuggestionS
1:22:26 Filters
1:22:38 Tripod

1:23:27 Flash
1:23:50 Strobe

Ten Suggestions To Take Better Photos (without spending a cent)

Image Credit: The Phoblographer

Our friends at The Phoblographer have a good article about ten points you should take in account to shot better pics. Not a new camera, nor other expensive equipment. The listed suggestions

can be applied whether you’ve had professional training or not, and it doesn’t matter whether you’re using a $100 point-and-shoot or an expensive DSLR. Geared primarily towards amateur hobbyists, perhaps those of you with more experience can get some ideas as well. Here are some suggestions that are independent of gear.

Here comes the list of ten tips & hints, all easy to achieve. I think the list works. It discusses the following points:

Click here to open the rest of the article