The History of Canon EF Lenses

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Canon Asia posted the first 2 parts of an article about the history of Canon’s EF lenses (I think there will be a third part).

How it started:

In March 1987, Canon released the “EOS 650”, the first Canon camera that was built in with a professional AF system. This also marked the birth of the EF lenses. I can still recall that prior to the launch of the EOS series, the biggest concern among Canon users was whether Canon would make changes to the existing FD mount standards. Until then, the FD mount adopted by Canon cameras before the EOS series had commanded tremendous support among both professional photographers and advanced amateurs. The view of the majority was that developing an AF system was unlikely to necessitate a change in the mount standards. However, contrary to the popular anticipation, Canon chose to break away from the traditional FD mount with the adoption of a brand new EF mount standard for its EOS series. This decision led to distress among users who possessed a large number of FD lenses, some of whom even saw it as an act of “betrayal”. Today, many years after its launch, it is almost impossible to find any user who would disagree that the decision made by Canon then was correct.

 

Adobe Creative Cloud For Students And Teachers $149 For 1 Year

Adobe Creative Cloud

B&H Photo is offering a 1 year subscription to Adobe Creative Cloud Student & Teacher Edition for $149 (click here). Regular price is $239.

Product highlights:

  • 1-Year Full Creative Cloud Membership
  • 20+ Programs & 20GB Free Cloud Storage
  • Complete Collaboration Solution
  • Keeps Files, Settings & Updates in Sync
  • Programs Downloadable Upon Cloud Access
  • Edge Tools & Services
  • Compatible with Adobe Touch Apps
  • Premiere Pro, After Effects, SpeedGrade
  • Photoshop, Illustrator, Lightroom
  • Dreamweaver, Muse, InDesign, and More

Vacuum Cleaner Accessory To Remove Sensor Dust (update)

Remove Sensor Dust

The object in the picture above is a new accessory for cleaning your DSLR’s sensor (remove dust on sensor). It’s actually the same principle of a vacuum cleaner, packaged into a lens shape.

The accessory is made by Chinese manufacture Nisshin Seiko, and for the time being it is available only for Canon mounts. Yes, you mount the “cleaner” on your DSLR as you would do with a lens. The accessory comes with a red ring that in some way resembles Canon’s “L” lenses.

The retail price is 3,500 Yen/210 Yuan/$34. For the time being it is not available in the USA.

Update: via DCFever I found the following video on YouTube (spoken in Japanese). It appears that the “vacuum cleaner” is (also) produced by the Japanese company Fujin.

Remove Sensor Dust

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[xjrumo.com via The New Camera]

Canon Aids Relief Efforts Following Earthquake In Southwestern China

Canon Rumor

Canon press release:

Canon aids relief efforts following earthquake in southwestern China

TOKYO, August 5, 2014—On August 3, a powerful earthquake struck southwestern China’s Yunnan Province, causing extensive destruction and loss of life. We at Canon would like to extend our heartfelt condolences to all those affected by this disaster and our thoughts go out to those suffering in its aftermath.

While we realize that the road to recovery will be challenging and time-consuming, we hope that the region will soon be able to begin the rebuilding and healing process.

The Canon Group is making a donation of RMB 3.2 million (approximately US$518,000) to aid in the relief efforts for the earthquake victims. The organization that will receive this donation is still under consideration.

Consumers Switching To Smartphones Cut Canon’s Sale Forecast By 2.1 Percent

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Image © Bloomberg
Bloomberg reports that Canon lowered its full-year sales forecast because of low demand by consumers, caused by users switching to smartphones for their photographic needs. Sales are a projected 3.78 trillion yen ($37 billion) for the current fiscal year, that’s 2.1% less than the the previous forecast.

Says Makoto Kikuchi, chief executive officer at Myojo Asset Management Co.:

“Demand for compact cameras declined sharply because of smartphones […] Canon was too aggressive with their SLR sales forecast. People who want them have already bought them.”

Canon sales of SLR cameras dropped from 2.1 million units to 1.7 million units in the 2nd quarter 2014, the sale of compact cameras decreased by 36%.

[Bloomberg via The New Camera]