Canon EOS 5D Mark IV review by Matt Granger, and why he ditches Sony for professional work (horrible service)

Canon Eos 5d Mark Iv Price

Canon EOS 5D Mark IV: B&H Photo, Adorama, Amazon USA, Amazon CA, KEH Camera, BestBuy, Canon CA, Canon USA

At a glance:

  • 30.4MP Full-Frame CMOS Sensor
  • DIGIC 6+ Image Processor
  • 3.2″ 1.62m-Dot Touchscreen LCD Monitor
  • DCI 4K Video at 30 fps; 8.8MP Still Grab
  • 61-Point High Density Reticular AF
  • Native ISO 32000, Expanded to ISO 102400
  • Dual Pixel RAW; AF Area Select Button
  • Dual Pixel CMOS AF and Movie Servo AF
  • 7 fps Shooting; CF & SD Card Slots
  • Built-In GPS and Wi-Fi with NFC

Matt Granger posted an 18 minutes video (above) where he discusses the Canon EOS 5D Mark IV features, like 4K, high ISO, dynamic range and more stuff.

In another video (below), Matt Granger explains why he ditches Sony when it comes to professional work. In one word: horrible service.

Well, “horrible service” suits exactly my own experience when it came to solve issues with my nephew’s Playstation. Simply unbelievable.

Canon EOS 5D Mark IV user manual download

More world-wide order links after the break.

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Debunking a myth: why Sony’s full-frame mirrorless cameras aren’t what Sony wants you to believe

Size advantage? Sony A7R vs Canon EOS 5Ds R (right), both with a 85mm lens.
Size advantage? Sony A7R vs Canon EOS 5Ds R (right), both with a 85mm lens (image courtesy of Camera Size)

I came over a very interesting and educated article at PetaPixel. It’s about why Sony’s full frame pro mirrorless was a fatal mistake that can’t hold up to the promises.

The article analyses five of the apparent advantages a full-frame mirrorless camera is supposed to have for the professional photographer, and systematically debunks those myths. A full-frame mirrorless camera is supposed to have the advantage of

  • Compactness
  • Weight
  • In-Body Image Stabilization
  • You can adapt non-native lenses
  • Live Exposure Preview

Well, it’s not as easy as Sony tries to sell it. The supposed advantages fail to deliver in the real world.. In the conclusion the author says:

So we find ourselves returning for the last time to the original question: what is the point of professional grade FF mirrorless? It isn’t for the compactness (beyond shooting with just one pancake type lens), certainly not for the faster autofocus, not for faster frame rates, not for EVF/exposure preview, not for access to a high cost-performance lens habitat, not for manual focus peaking, not for the ergonomics, and almost universally not for the sake of adapting lenses.

When it comes to FF professional grade mirrorless, the answer is that there is little or no point. People are buying into it because it is an irrational fad. You end up having to buy lots of big and expensive lenses for the one tiny body, when it is preferable to have lots of smaller lenses for the one big body, since the total lens-body combination is the same anyway due to physics. In actual fact the lens-body combination makes professional grade FF mirrorless multi-lens packages larger overall. Read the article…

An article that’s definitely worth to be read before you waste your money for something that will turn out not to be what you expected and what you have been told. Better go for serious gear.

[via PetaPixel]

Here is why the pros ditch (or avoid) Sony gear

In the 16 minutes video above, photographer Matt Granger explains why he decided to ditch Sony and to switch back to Nikon. It’s not about the quality of the gear, it is about the lack of quality when it comes to service and assistance – two factors that are critical to pros. And at least Sony’s service in Australia isn’t what a pro might expect.

It all comes down to SERVICE. For many types of my work the gear itself is suitable for me – The sensors are quality. The images and video are outstanding. For other work I have never used them (rough conditions, tricky focus). But with service like this – I just can’t use them at all.

As I said, this is my personal experience in Australia and is based on MY needs. The details of all the ‘pro support’ programs shown are the Australian offerings.

Stick with Canon if you want to avoid nasty experiences ;-) Canon’s CPS (Canon Professional Services) will not let you in the rain. See also my article about the Sony a7RII.

[via PetaPixel]